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    Who is planting a garden this year?

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    Brook

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Brook on Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:57 pm

    My courgettes are flowering and the rest of the plants have nicely grown cheers
    I had to bring some of the pots down in the garden.

    Looking good! Ours are starting to slow down now...cucumbers are still going strong and tomatoes are starting.

    Watermelons are what I'm waiting for. I keep asking LH...are they ready yet?
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:23 am

    Brook wrote:

    Watermelons are what I'm waiting for. I keep asking LH...are they ready yet?

    sunny we are like kids sharing our new toys and looking forward for the next one with impatience .
    Only they are lively gorgious , beautifull , smelling and tasting good cheers
    This is so much joy.

    Love for you Brook
    mudra


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    Brook

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Brook on Mon Jul 18, 2011 6:24 pm

    Oh boy!!!!

    yipee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Our first watermelon.....Buster thinks he's getting some


    21 pounds.....and kicking...LOL

    Oh yeah....cucumbers went from 68 cents each to 78 cents each....our crop value just increased with the cost of living here in the States.

    lionhawk is walkin around like a proud papa
    sunny Those are his moccasins he speaks of frequently in the pic.

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    Brook

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Brook on Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:01 pm

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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Wed Jul 20, 2011 6:25 am

    Brook wrote:Oh boy!!!!

    yipee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Our first watermelon.....Buster thinks he's getting some


    [i][b]21 pounds.....and kicking...LOL


    Wow Brook I think this watermelon bursted into life with joy cheers
    What a beauty sunny
    I think it loved the soft sound of these mocassins around it.

    Love from me
    mudra
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    Brook

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Brook on Wed Jul 20, 2011 1:40 pm

    Mudra...it was delicious! Sweet all the way to the outer rind. Now being that city girl I WAS...I used to buy it in the stores and toward the rind (outer edge) it became tasteless...I don't know why the one's in the stores are like that....hot house grown maybe? But this was sweet throughout.

    Big difference in home grown taste of all the vegetables we've grown I've noticed since this new experience for me. Which in all tells me that what you get from the stores is not the same quality in any sense.

    Just sharing my new experience in grown your own garden.
    sunny
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    lindabaker

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  lindabaker on Wed Jul 20, 2011 4:25 pm

    Brook, welcome to the homely crowd! Ha ha. I grew up eating farm produce and there is nothing in the world like it! I would rather eat a garden grown meal than a fancy meal in NYC any day! That watermelon was sweet, I can tell. The south produces the sweetest ones...
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Sat Jul 23, 2011 12:27 pm

    My Courgette plants are all flowering but so far I can only see male flowers coming out .
    LionHawk any light you can shed on this ?
    Do the male flowers come out first ?
    I know polination has to take place between male and female flowers .

    Thanks .

    Love from me
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Wed Jul 27, 2011 3:33 pm

    fukuoka style seed balls for no till farming

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_V9WI3ObyE&feature=player_embedded


    Love Always
    mudra
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    Carol
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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Carol on Mon Aug 01, 2011 7:59 am

    I just spotted this and am passing it along.

    Beautiful and Edible Ground Covers

    Aug 1st, 2011 | By Carmen | Category: Food, Gardening
    I have found that there are a couple reasons that one might like to plant a ground covering that is edible. The first is that you have a small yard or garden plot and want to increase the amount of produce that you grow. The second, and my reason, is that you are allergic to common grasses and wish to grow something beautiful that you are not allergic to. What ever your reason, we are going to discuss what plants you may use for a ground covering that are both edible and beautiful.

    Plants to Consider

    Bears garlic

    Bears garlic, an allium which is called “ramps” in Appalachia and “l’ail des ours” in France, is native to both Europe and the U.S. and prefers shade. This allium densely covers the ground and gives off a delicious garlic aroma the minute you touch one of its leaves. Eat the leaves of this plant, and you will find it has a full flavor somewhere between garlic and leeks but not as strong as either. You can chop the leaves into a salad or use in place of leeks or sorrel in your favorite soup and quiche recipes. Bears garlic is high in Vitamins A and C and many minerals too.

    Bears garlic mixes well with bluebells and celandine poppies, natives of America, which also prefer shady places with moist soil high in humus and other organic matter. Plus this edible covering bears beautiful blossoms of its own.

    There is only one trick in growing bears garlic, and that is finding a source to purchase it from. If you know where a wild patch grows, harvest seeds from the existing plants and sow then in your yard. This would be easier than finding a nursery or other supplier.

    Alpine strawberries

    Low growing with small fruit, these plants are great for planting beneath tall flowers or in a front bed in your garden. This variety of berry doesn’t send runners, so your plants will be contained, for the most part. They are also day neutral, so they bear fruit throughout the summer until the first frost. The fruit are compact with a huge flavor. They enjoy full sun, well-drained soil, and well-fertilized soil. Space your plants twelve inches apart. As the plants will eventually make a solid mass, they will need to be broke up and separated every three to four years. Varieties to consider are Alexandria and Mignonette, which bear bright red fruit. Another option is the Yellow Wonder, a lighter-colored variety that doesn’t attract birds as easily.

    Cranberries

    Cranberries have beautiful green leaves and tart, bright red berries; also, the leaves turn red in fall, making it a great addition to a flowering border. This North American plant produces bright red, tangy berries that can be used for jams, jellies, and juice. Commercial cranberry growers flood the bogs to harvest the berries, but homegrown cranberries do not need all of this water. The key to successfully growing these berries is full sun in mild climates, partial sun in hot climates, and mildly acidic soil. Adding peat moss, sulfur, and compost to your soil will get these plants off to a good start.

    Cranberries are hardy in zones three and four, but you may have some die off during cold, snowless winters. Be sure to keep your berry patch free of weeds, well watered, and fertilized in spring to keep them green and producing quality berries. You can keep thee berries in the freezer and use them as desired through the winter months.

    Creeping Oregon grapes

    While this may not be among the favorite of edible ground covers, this sour fruit can be used for making jelly, pies, and homemade wine. This creeping evergreen grows about a foot tall, is hardy in zone five, can tolerate some shade, and makes a nice addition to your yard, even between the trees. It has beautiful yellow flowers in spring, and the blue berries are best harvested after a good frost (as this improves their flavor).

    Low bush blueberries

    This classic, wild blueberry grows on rocky crags and in open wooded areas. It grows eight to twelve inches tall and is hardy to zone three. They are tough plants and a good addition to partially sunny areas; the key is planting in well-drained, moist, acidic soil.

    Unlike other blueberries, this variety has a two-year fruiting cycle. Plants that give fruit this year will have to put on more vegetative growth next year before they will bear fruit again. For this reason, some will mow them down in the fall to encourage new growth. When they are not mowed back, their fruit production will decline. These berries are harder to harvest than the high bush variety, but they have a more intense flavor, making them great for pies, jellies, and sauces. These plants send out underground runners and will fill in their growing area over time.

    Herbs

    If you need an edible ground cover for high-traffic areas, herbs may be your best choice. Specifically thyme and mint, as they will withstand some foot traffic and still produce flavorful leaves. Creeping, or wooly, thyme grows well between stepping-stones and other rock formations, and the aroma is very inviting. Mint is also refreshing to walk upon, and the Corsician variety grows about half an inch tall, making it a great plant to between your pavers or along your garden path. If you are growing the mint for culinary use too, you will want to use a larger leaved variety, such as English mint. (And a note: mint loves to send out runners. If it is not contained by pavers or a solid border, mint may well migrate into other areas; depending on where you have planted it, this could be a positive or a negative.)

    If you are looking for a bright green border plant, try either curly or flat-leaved parsley, as they will contrast well with your colorful flowers and will withstand cold winter weather. And to grow over a wall or for a woodier, low-growing plant, try growing prostrate rosemary. It looks great in containers too.

    http://www.offthegridnews.com/2011/08/01/beautiful-and-edible-ground-covers/


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Mon Aug 15, 2011 6:44 am

    Gardening Allotments Lead to "Staggering" 51% Fall in Anti-social Behaviour

    In 2009, the early days of Landshare, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall visited a community allotment for local residents in Leigh, Greater Manchester, as part of a River Cottage programme. Two years on, the allotments are thriving, and local police are amazed to find that anti-social behaviour has fallen by over 50% in the area.

    read on and watch video at the link : http://www.activistpost.com/2011/08/gardening-allotments-lead-to-staggering.html

    How is your community garden doing Linda ?

    Love Always
    mudra
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    biophiliac

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    Collard Greens

    Post  biophiliac on Mon Aug 29, 2011 3:20 pm

    Just have to comment on this thread. I recently “discovered” Collard Greens – yes, a northerner from far eastern Canada. My husband picked up a few plants ‘on a whim’ – planted them in the garden & we’re hooked! These greens, when cooked, provide an amazing amount of nutrients. So, for the first time, I cooked collard greens – I’m now starting to understand the obsession with these incredible vegetables. (I understand they're almost sacred to Southerners). They grow like crazy: 1 cup of cooked collards contain 49 calories, 4 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber. Vitamins abound - 1 cup of cooked collards provides 34 mg of vitamin C, 5900 IU's of vitamin A and 177 mcg of folic acid. As for minerals, 1 cup of cooked collards contain 226 mg of calcium, .87 mg of iron and 494 mg of potassium. So if you want a cheap, easy-to-grow highly nutritious veggie - try some Collard Greens.
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Mon Aug 29, 2011 3:28 pm


    Thank you Biophiliac. I'll add these to my balcony garden

    Flowers

    Love for You
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Wed Sep 14, 2011 5:26 pm

    Instant Organic Liquid Compost DIY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQjVOFDH3S0


    Instant Organic Liquid Compost DIY & Soil pH Reduction In One Easy Move, have been making this home made organic liquid compost for many years now, tested it at a local horticultural establishment, & proved to work, as you can see from this video. One can wash this instant compost over Seedbeds with no harmful effects, in tests grass & flower seeds grew on well, with no damage done on overspray, and my vegetables love it.

    Highly Alkaline soil can be brought back to Neutral or even Acidic if you wish, within a few days, applying this liquid around individual vegetable & other plants can bring the soil to appropriate levels for their individual needs, just add a cupful at a time & test daily.

    This Year My Soil Alkalinity Has Risen & Is Too High, So Adding This Home Made DIY Instant Organic Liquid Compost, we can use up & recycle any organic Kitchen "Waste" Except Onions & Garlic as they cause an otherwise odourless compost to smell strong, though some might feel these could deter Slugs and Snails, in my experience the use of garlic as a deterrent against our slippery friends has Never worked.

    In This instance, am using Tea Bags, Bananas, and Greens along with Nettles, (Heads) & Comfrey from the garden ,all liquidised & oxygenated in water, mixed together and into the ground within a couple of days.

    Please Note; Used Only Half Of The Comfrey & Nettles Seen in this video, the leftovers go to a long term liquid composting bin or heap.

    Love Always
    mudra
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Wed Sep 14, 2011 5:40 pm

    slug defence

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcUGBOL7eek


    Love Always
    mudra
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    Floyd

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Floyd on Thu Oct 20, 2011 4:26 am

    Tomatoes came late But looks like we have enough over to make a soup.
    Add croutons and a bit of fresh basil. Voila.
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    mudra

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    astronomy Masterclass

    Post  mudra on Thu Oct 20, 2011 8:51 am

    Floyd wrote:Tomatoes came late But looks like we have enough over to make a soup.
    Add croutons and a bit of fresh basil. Voila.

    mmmmm sounds good Floyd Cheerful .
    My tomatoe plants have been a feast for the slugs .
    I left them that and saved all the rest .
    Had radishes , little courgettes the size of an big apple .
    I guess they probably needed a bigger pot .
    I have beans right now .
    Was'nt successfull at all with the potatoes I planted in a bag
    but was lucky with chards.
    Overall a really nice experience although my water consumption
    has doubled in the process so I am not sure I saved money.
    But I am just enjoying it all.

    Love from me
    mudra
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    Floyd

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Floyd on Fri Oct 21, 2011 3:18 am

    mudra wrote:
    Overall a really nice experience although my water consumption
    has doubled in the process so I am not sure I saved money.
    But I am just enjoying it all.

    Love from me
    mudra

    Mudra. You could think about investing in a water butt which will save money in the long term as well as save on your water consumption.[img]

    You can connect them to your drains and guttering to collect rain water or use old bath and sink water for them.
    This one only cost £20.
    Of course you will need a little space for it.
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    Floyd

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Floyd on Thu Nov 24, 2011 7:06 am

    Im still picking fat red juicy tomatoes of the tom plants. Its nearly december!
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    Carol
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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Carol on Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:49 am

    I'm having a devil of a time getting the big tomatoes to ripen. We've had a lot of rain and they keep falling off. However, the apple tree is in bloom and the cucumbers are blooming and fruiting. There are still blueberries fruiting and papaya along with the bananas that need harvesting soon, The pineapple and potato beds look great. Slowly I'm learning how to do this. At least the chickens are very reliable.

    Floyd what do you do to get such good tomatoes?


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
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    Floyd

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Floyd on Fri Nov 25, 2011 3:14 am

    Carol wrote:I'm having a devil of a time getting the big tomatoes to ripen. We've had a lot of rain and they keep falling off. However, the apple tree is in bloom and the cucumbers are blooming and fruiting. There are still blueberries fruiting and papaya along with the bananas that need harvesting soon, The pineapple and potato beds look great. Slowly I'm learning how to do this. At least the chickens are very reliable.

    Floyd what do you do to get such good tomatoes?

    Carol. Sometimes its best to leave the tom plants to their own devices and dont love them too much. I find that way they get max nutrients from the soil before watering again tho obviously in the growing stage they need water daily.

    If they are big enough to pick take them off and place them in a fruit bowl of nice yellow bananas. The bananas give off a chemical that ripens the tomatoes and after a day or so they will start turning red. You may have to buy a new bunch of nanas to finish the job for the larger toms.
    It works!!

    My mum just leaves them on the window sill. Ive heard you can but them in a brown paper bag with other ripened fruit too but the first two methods mentioned above seem to work better from what I have seen.
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    Floyd

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Floyd on Fri Nov 25, 2011 3:28 am

    Oh forgot to mention
    My tom plants where on some shelving and I replaced the plastic cover over them (tiny green house)about 3 weeks ago and refrained from watering them. They grew large and ripened on the vine. We had a very mild October and November here so that has helped to extend the crop. I even had peppers until last week but I did bring them indoors over a month ago.

    Having said that, I dont get a great amount of sunlight as there is a huge tree in the way and things took a little longer than usual to get going than say you had am obstacle free south or west facing garden
    F
    Good luck!
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    Floyd

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Floyd on Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:03 am



    Carol
    Here are some I picked on tuesday

    The red ones came of the plant fat and red apart from the small one on the right which as you can see is turning red next to the old banana which I am going to eat as I walk to the pub in 5 minutes.

    the green plum toms and the 2 alicantes are fat but green and the new bananas will help turn em red. Ive noticed that this process takes longer with plum tomatoes.

    the other I option is to move to a sunny country.

    Hope this helps.
    F
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    Nenuphar

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  Nenuphar on Sun Jan 01, 2012 10:11 am

    Winter seems to have arrived here today. Very chilly...-18 degrees C. Despite the weather, I am already planning/daydreaming for my summer garden. I think I will try growing huge sunflowers this year. Either Russian Mammoth or Giganteus. Crazy Happy Have any of you grown some of these varieties? If you have pictures, I'd love to see!
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    mudra

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    Re: Who is planting a garden this year?

    Post  mudra on Tue Jan 03, 2012 4:37 am

    Roger Doiron: My subversive (garden) plot

    A vegetable garden can do more than save you money -- it can save the world. At TEDxDirigo Roger Doiron shows how gardens can re-localize our food and feed our growing population.

    TED talk : Arrow http://www.ted.com/talks/roger_doiron_my_subversive_garden_plot.html

    Love Always
    mudra

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