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    Former Times Music

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    newel

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Sun Jul 11, 2010 6:57 pm

    Thank you for your kind words mudra and for the videos as well.

    J. S. Bach - Mass in B Minor BWV 232

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    Dona nobis pacem (give us peace), the last part of Bach's mass in B minor sung by the Berliner Philharmoniker and conducted by Otto Klemperer:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMq44NLoVPc

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    Playlists of the whole mass:

    Herreweghe, Collegium Vocale
    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=0AD5A2D59504CD76
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ6FHaSFOrg&feature=PlayList&p=0AD5A2D59504CD76&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

    The Sixteen, Harry Christopher
    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=009DCD7688A1945C
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUvaOD5692Y&feature=PlayList&p=009DCD7688A1945C&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

    La Petit Bande - Van De Nederlandse Bach Vereniging Choir
    Gustav Leonhardt , Director
    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=0FA3D40D5572E1AC
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75xuXExF1BU&feature=PlayList&p=0FA3D40D5572E1AC&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

    Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=79A95C103B37D72A
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vi6fhfkZFoA&feature=PlayList&p=79A95C103B37D72A&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

    Bach Collegium of Japan, Masaaki Suzuki
    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=BFE1F1AD1D675652
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idsdL12wBro&feature=PlayList&p=BFE1F1AD1D675652&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

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    mudra

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Mon Jul 12, 2010 2:06 pm

    You got yourself an avatar :)
    Very beautifull .It ressembles that lovely quiet space you have within .

    Bach is certainly my favourite musician .
    What is it about him that distinguishes him so much from all the others ?
    His music seems to be inspired from the most higher spheres ...something only the soul can grasp.

    Magnificent " Magnificat "

    Conducter : Nikolaus Harnoncourt
    Kloster Melk Benedictine Monastery, Austria.


    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=67021E656921BACA

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    newel

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Mon Jul 12, 2010 7:41 pm

    mudra wrote:
    What is it about him that distinguishes him so much from all the others ?

    He was mastering breathing. Many of his peices sound like they have been written in one single breath. It's one thing to reach the most higher spheres, but to stay there long enough to write a whole piece, and to go back everyday right where you left the day before, with the same breath and counsciousness, that requires mastery and dedication.

    Bach was not the best melodist out there. I have heard much better melodists. Take Scarlatti for instance. He had an incredibly creative mind. He had so much ideas that it seems like he couldn't keep up with writing them down. However, he had a short breath and was missing the architectural capabilities to make the best of his ideas.

    <object width="320" height="240"><param name="movie" value="http://www.artistshousemusic.org/player/flvplayershare.swf?file=http://www.artistshousemusic.com/video/usc/LC-18-Breathing.flv"></param><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.artistshousemusic.org/player/flvplayershare.swf?file=http://www.artistshousemusic.com/video/usc/LC-18-Breathing.flv" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="320" height="240" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>
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    mudra

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Tue Jul 13, 2010 1:58 pm

    metaw3 wrote:

    He was mastering breathing. Many of his peices sound like they have been written in one single breath. It's one thing to reach the most higher spheres, but to stay there long enough to write a whole piece, and to go back everyday right where you left the day before, with the same breath and counsciousness, that requires mastery and dedication.


    Indeed that makes a lot of sense breath control is self-control. Breath-mastery is self-mastery, and the breathlessness stage is the deathlessness stage.
    The breathlessness stage this is what I feel Bach reached .. the perfect realization of his divine nature . His music reaches directly to the soul .
    Only some excellent indian music has been able to lift me as high as some of Bach's pieces do . But then this is exactly the purpose of indian music .. to move
    you through all the chakras up the God self . You can't interpret it through the mind .. The mind is shortcircuited and you are left without words ...like suspended
    out of time .

    L'aube enchantée
    Horacio Parravicini, Marion Desjacques
    Based on the raga Todi of Ravi Shankar


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqtTELrg0yc&feature=player_embedded




    [quote]Indian classical music is principally based on melody and rhythm, not on harmony, counterpoint, chords, modulation and the other basics of Western classical music.

    The system of Indian music known as Raga Sangeet can be traced back nearly two thousand years to its origin in the Vedic hymns of the Hindu temples, the fundamental source of all Indian music. Thus, as in Western music, the roots of Indian classical music are religious. To us, music can be a spiritual discipline on the path to self-realisation, for we follow the traditional teaching that sound is God - Nada Brahma: By this process individual consciousness can be elevated to a realm of awareness where the revelation of the true meaning of the universe - its eternal and unchanging essence - can be joyfully experienced. Our ragas are the vehicles by which this essence can be perceived.

    The ancient Vedic scriptures teach that there are two types of sound. One is a vibration of ether, the upper or purer air near the celestral realm. This sound is called Anahata Nad or unstruck sound. Sought after by great enlightened yogis, it can only be heard by them. The sound of the universe is the vibration thought by some to be like the music of the spheres that the Greek Pythagoras described in the 6th century B.C. The other sound Ahata Nad or struck sound, is the vibration of air in the lower atmosphere closer to the earth. It is any sound that we hear in nature or man-made sounds, musical and non-musical.

    The tradition of Indian classical music is an oral one. It is taught directly by the guru to the disciple, rather than by the notation method used in the West. The very heart of Indian music is the raga: the melodic form upon which the musician improvises. This framework is established by tradition and inspired by the creative spirits of master musicians.

    Ragas are extremely difficult to explain in a few words. Though Indian music is modal in character, ragas should not be mistaken as modes that one hears in the music of the Middle and Far Eastern countries, nor be understood to be a scale, melody per se, a composition, or a key. A raga is a scientific, precise, subtle and aesthetic melodic form with its own peculiar ascending and descending movement consisting of either a full seven note octave, or a series of six or five notes (or a combination of any of these) in a rising or falling structure called the Arohana and Avarohana. It is the subtle difference in the order of notes, an omission of a dissonant note, an emphasis on a particular note, the slide from one note to another, and the use of microtones together with other subtleties, that demarcate one raga from the other.

    There is a saying in Sanskrit - "Ranjayathi iti Ragah" - which means, "that which colours the mind is a raga." For a raga to truly colour the mind of the listener, its effect must be created not only through the notes and the embellishments, but also by the presentation of the specific emotion or mood characteristic of each raga. Thus through rich melodies in our music, every human emotion, every subtle feeling in man and nature can be musically expressed and experienced.

    The performing arts in India - music, dance,drama, and poetry - are based on the concept of Nava Rasa , or the "nine sentiments." Literally, rasa means "juice" or "extract" but here in this context, we take it to mean "emotion" or "sentiment." The acknowledged order of these sentiments is as follows: Shringara (romantic and erotic): Hasya (humorous): Karuna (pathetic): Raudra (anger): Veera (heroic): Bhayanaka (fearful): Vibhatsa (disgustful): Adbhuta (amazement): Shanta (peaceful).

    Each raga is principally dominated by one of these nine rasas, although the performer can also bring out other emotions in a less prominent way. The more closely the notes of a raga conform to the expression of one single idea or emotion, the more overwhelming the effect of the raga.

    In addition to being associated with a particular mood, each raga is also closely connected to a particular time of day or a season of the year. The cycle of day and night, as well as the cycle of the seasons, is analogous to the cycle of life itself. Each part of the day - such as the time before dawn, noon, late afternoon, early evening, late night - is associated with a definite sentiment. The explanation of the time associated with each raga may be found in the nature of the notes that comprise it, or in historical anecdotes concerning the raga.

    Although there are 72 "melas" or parent scales upon which ragas are based, Indian music scholars have estimated that, with all their permutations and combinations, there exist over 6,000 ragas ! But a raga is not merely a matter of the ascending - descending structure. It must have its "chalan "- or certain note patterns characteristic of the raga; its principle important note (vadi); the second important note (samavadi); and its main feature known as "jan" (life) or "mukhda" (face), the cluster of a few notes by which a raga is immediately recognised.

    In terms of aesthetics, a raga is the projection of the artist's inner spirit, a manifestation of his most profound sentiments and sensibilities brought forth through tones and melodies. The musician must breath life into each raga as he unfolds and expands it. As much as 90 percent of Indian music may be improvised and because so very much depends on understanding the spirit and nuances of the art, the relationship between the artist and his guru is the keystone of this ancient tradition. From the beginning, the aspiring musician requires special and individual attention to bring him to the moment of artistic mastery. The unique aura of a raga (one might say its "soul") is its spiritual quality and manner of expression, and this cannot be learned from any book.

    It is only after many long and extensive years of "sadhana" (dedicated practice and discipline) under the guidance of one's guru and his blessings, that the artist is empowered to put "prana" (the breath of life) into a raga. This is accomplished by employing the secrets imparted by one's teacher such as the use of "shrutis" (microtones other than the 12 semitones in an octave, Indian music using smaller intervals than Western music: 22 within an octave): "gamakas" (special varieties of glissando which connect one note to the other), and "andolan" (a sway - but not a vibrato). The result is that each note pulsates with life and the raga becomes vibrant and incandescent.

    Next to be considered are the "talas" or "rhythmic cycles" of a raga. There is unique intricacy and rhythmic sophistication in Indian music. There are talas ranging from a 3 beat cycle to 108 beats within a cycle! The most popular talas are those which have 5,6,7,8,10,12,14, and 16 beats to a cycle. There are also other cycles such as 9,11,13,15,17, and 19 beats, etc., which are only played by outstanding musicians on rare occasions.

    The division in a tala, and the stress on the first beat (called sum), are the most important rhythmic factors. While there are talas having the same number of beats,they differ because the division and accents are not the same. For example, there is a tala known as "Dhamar" which has 14 beats in the cycle divided 5+5+4: another tala, "Ada Chautal" has the same number of beats, but is divided 2+4+4+4: still another tala, "Chanchar: is divided 3+4+3+4.

    In vocal music, a drummer will accompany a singer either in slow, medium, or fast tempo at the start of a song in whatever tala the singer chooses. He will do the same when he accompanies an instrumentalist in the gat section of a composition. Like ragas, talas also have their own characteristics. Some of the older traditional talas , such as "Chautal" (12 beats) and "Dhamar" (14 beats) are played on a two-faced drum known as pakhawaj. This accompaniment is used in the old traditional "Dhrupad-Dhamar" form of singing and in instrumental performances on the veena, rabab, surbahar, etc. Today, most vocal and instrumental music is based on the contemporary form called"khyal" and is accompanied by the tabla, a two-piece drum.

    The improvisatory nature of Indian classical music requires the artist to take into consideration the setting, time allowed for his recital, his mood and the feeling he discerns in the audience before playing. Since Indian music is religious in origin, one finds the spiritual quality in most of the musician's performances.

    The traditional recital begins with the alap section - the stately and serene exploration of the chosen raga. After this slow, introspective, heartfelt, sometimes sad beginning, the musician moves on to the jor. In this part, rhythm enters and is developed. Innumerable variations on the raga's basic theme are elaborated. There is no drum accompaniment in either the alap or the jor.

    The alap and the jor evolve into the gat, the fixed composition of the raga. Here the drums enter with the wonderful rhythmic structure of the gat and its time cycle, the tala. This section in based on the "Khyal: form. From this moment on, the gat (which can be anything between 4 and 16 bars of fixed composition) becomes the vehicle for the musician to return to after his improvisation. While the artist has complete freedom to improvise, he may do so only as long as he does not leave the format of the raga and tala. This freedom within the bounds of artistic discipline comes only after many years of training and sadhana. This is why one cannot rightfully compare the improvisation in Indian music with the improvisation of jazz.

    The step-by-step acceleration of the rhythm in the gat finally culminates in the jhala portion as it becomes more and more playful and exciting.Sawal jabab ,the dazzling and rapid dialogue between sitar and tabla, has the power to enthrall even the most uninitiated listener with its thrilling interplay.

    Often at the conclusion of a recital, the musician may choose to play a "thumri' or "dhun." This semi-classical style is much freer and completely romantic, sensual and erotic.

    Indian music is much more appreciated and respected today in the west. Many composers and musicians have been influenced by our music. The openness, willingness to learn, and sincere enthusiasm of western audiences are a continuing source of inspiration and delight.

    http://www.ravishankar.org/indian_music.html
    Ravi Shankar
    Morning raga : Todi Rupakdal part 1


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOx6aBHmROo&feature=PlayList&p=167E4C9DA2FF2299&playnext_from=PL&index=8



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    newel

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Tue Jul 13, 2010 8:54 pm

    The Partita in D minor for solo violin (BWV 1004) by Johann Sebastian Bach was written during the period 1717–1723 and some scholars—Professor Helga Thoene prominently—suggest it was written in memory of Bach's first wife, Maria Barbara Bach. Bach returned from a long absence from home to discover upon entering the house that Maria Barbara, his wife of 13 years whom he had left behind in perfect health, had recently died and was already buried. The partita contains five movements:

    1. Allemanda
    2. Corrente
    3. Sarabanda
    4. Giga
    5. Ciaccona

    The ciaccona is considered a pinnacle of the solo violin repertoire in that it covers every aspect of violin-playing known during Bach's time and thus it is among the most difficult pieces to play for that instrument. Since Bach's time, several transcriptions of the piece have been made for other instruments.

    Johannes Brahms, in a letter to Clara Schumann, said about the ciaccona:

    On one stave, for a small instrument, the man writes a whole world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings. If I imagined that I could have created, even conceived the piece, I am quite certain that the excess of excitement and earth-shattering experience would have driven me out of my mind.


    Different versions:

    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C8F42FCA863E6A33
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uCdKH_zHVs&feature=PlayList&p=C8F42FCA863E6A33&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

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    mudra

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Wed Jul 14, 2010 5:16 pm

    Hilary Hahn .. your favourite violonist I remember .
    It is not that she is perfect .. she is beyond perfection
    raising her wonderfull mastery of music and violin to the realm of pure consciousness .
    I think she plays from the soul and this is where she reaches us.
    It is sad to hear about the context in which Bach wrote Chaconne .
    And yet he is one of these beings that can transmute deep sadness into pure vibrational beauty .
    A true alchemist.
    Thank you for sharing this exquisite piece metaw.

    Hilary Hahn - The Lark Ascending v-Vaughan Williams

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oz1hWcPkods&feature=PlayList&p=E410BB9EBFABE2C6&playnext_from=PL&playnext=1&index=42



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    mudra

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Fri Jul 16, 2010 7:29 pm

    Valentina Igoshina plays Chopin's Fantaisie Impromptu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qa0Z6g1XJkU&feature=related



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    newel

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Fri Jul 16, 2010 7:50 pm

    I love Chopin. Thank you mudra.
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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Fri Jul 16, 2010 8:38 pm

    Bach is breathing the hell out of this guy: Lmfao

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c46fr2EZOhQ

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    Gould's interpretation as a reference:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tw-0PRovMU8

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    <object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/8Ah7toQ6YtA&hl=en_US&fs=1?rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/8Ah7toQ6YtA&hl=en_US&fs=1?rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
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    mudra

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Sun Jul 18, 2010 12:42 pm

    metaw3 wrote:Bach is breathing the hell out of this guy: Lmfao

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c46fr2EZOhQ

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    I listened to it eyes open and then eyes closed ..
    Eyes closed was much better Wink

    Thanks for the chuckle Laugh

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Sun Jul 18, 2010 12:46 pm

    Michael Lucarelli
    Moonlight Sonata


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kS8eVFq1ZdU&feature=related



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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Sun Jul 18, 2010 1:57 pm

    Some more Chopin for you.

    Sonata no 3 Op 58 B minor (1/4)
    Idil Beret

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WoqES8FbSI&feature=PlayList&p=2C001C60D0EC99C9&playnext_from=PL&index=27&playnext=1



    Revolutionary Etude Op. 10 No 12
    Idil Beret


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCvQIh-kN0k&feature=related



    Trois Nouvelles Etudes Op. Posth N°2 in A flat major
    Idil Beret




    Nocturne in B flat minor Op. 9 No.1
    Idil Beret

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_tRkATZwdk&feature=related




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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Mon Jul 19, 2010 4:28 pm

    Franz Lizt's La Campanella
    Yundi Li


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEnfZjqMSy0&feature=related




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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Wed Jul 21, 2010 7:18 pm

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Wed Jul 21, 2010 8:10 pm

    Arvo Part's Te Deum

    Only the last part, but from my favorite performance of this piece:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFQ2joN1hJw
    A masterpiece of composition, performance, and recording:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B000024ZDF/ref=cm_ciu_pdp_images_0?ie=UTF8&index=0

    Another performance live and complete this time:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtdKBOebO5E&feature=PlayList&p=EF15799F9621DC00&index=0&playnext=1



    Last edited by metaw3 on Thu Jul 29, 2010 8:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Wed Jul 21, 2010 9:28 pm

    Arvo Part's Magnificat

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbxnnC22gwY

    Magnificat was composed in 1989 by Arvo Pärt. A setting of the Latin Magnificat text, it is in tintinnabuli style, which was invented by Pärt in the mid 1970s. It is scored for mixed choir: soprano solo, sopranos I and II, alto, and tenor and bass divisi. It lasts approximately seven minutes.

    <object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/TbxnnC22gwY&hl=en_US&fs=1?rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/TbxnnC22gwY&hl=en_US&fs=1?rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Thu Jul 22, 2010 5:38 pm

    Superb music metaw ... a discovery for me .
    It left me in awe .
    The Cantus is the last thing I listened to last night .
    I just could'nt get away from it .
    The magnificat I listenend to today . It reminded me of something .
    It took me all day to remember ...
    Holy Harmony a beautifull piece of music from Jonathan Goldman
    using the ancient Solfegio frequencies .
    Arvo Pärt 's magnificat is so much richer ..I am not comparing both as
    they are so different.
    But yet if you listen to Holy Harmony you may understand what I mean .

    The entire piece can be downloaded here :

    rapidshare.com Jonathan_Goldman_Holy_Harmony_01_Holy_Harmony.mp3

    Solfeggio Frequencies

    These original sound frequencies were apparently used in Ancient Gregorian Chants, such as the great hymn to St. John the Baptist, along with others that church authorities say were lost centuries ago. The chants and their special tones were believed to impart tremendous spiritual blessings when sung in harmony during religious masses. These powerful frequencies were rediscovered by Dr. Joseph Puleo as described in the book Healing Codes for the Biological Apocalypse by Dr. Leonard Horowitz. I give honor to both of these gentleman for the part they’ve played in helping return these lost frequencies back to humanity.

    The Six Solfeggio Frequencies include:

    UT – 396 Hz – Liberating Guilt and Fear
    RE – 417 Hz – Undoing Situations and Facilitating Change
    MI – 528 Hz – Transformation and Miracles (DNA Repair)
    FA – 639 Hz – Connecting/Relationships
    SOL – 741 Hz – Awakening Intuition
    LA – 852 Hz – Returning to Spiritual Order
    For example, the third note, frequency 528, relates to the note MI on the scale and derives from the phrase "MI-ra gestorum" in Latin meaning "miracle." Stunningly, this is the exact frequency used by genetic biochemists to repair broken DNA – the genetic blueprint upon which life is based!

    http://www.redicecreations.com/specialreports/2006/01jan/solfeggio.html

    Those two pieces were so soul filling that I'll leave the Te deum for tomorrow Cheerful
    The videos themselves were so unusual ...so away from anything predictable that they kind
    of short circuited my mind enough to allow me
    to feel one with the music and away from the present time world.

    Thank you so much metaw.
    This deserves a gift from me Cheerful
    It is so inspiring to come to this thread.




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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Thu Jul 22, 2010 6:42 pm

    mudra wrote:The magnificat I listenend to today . It reminded me of something .
    It took me all day to remember ...
    Holy Harmony a beautifull piece of music from Jonathan Goldman
    using the ancient Solfegio frequencies .

    [...]

    These original sound frequencies were apparently used in Ancient Gregorian Chants,

    You have a good ear mudra. Part's style, tintinnabuli, is based on his contemplative study of Gregorian chant. Part's oeuvre has 2 very different periods. He started with neoclassicism and serialism, then in the early seventies his music was banned by the Soviet censors, and he stopped writing music for a long period. It's during that period that he studied Gregorian chant and then started writing music again (late seventies), but like the one I posted.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arvo_P%C3%A4rt#Musical_oeuvre


    Pärt's oeuvre is generally divided into two periods.

    His early works ranged from rather severe neo-classical styles influenced by Shostakovich, Prokofiev, and Bartók. He then began to compose using Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique and serialism. This, however, not only earned the ire of the Soviet establishment, but also proved to be a creative dead-end. When early works were banned by Soviet censors, Pärt entered the first of several periods of contemplative silence, during which he studied choral music from the 14th to 16th centuries.[3] In this context, Pärt's biographer, Paul Hillier, observed that "He had reached a position of complete despair in which the composition of music appeared to be the most futile of gestures, and he lacked the musical faith and will-power to write even a single note."

    The spirit of early European polyphony informed the composition of Pärt's transitional Third Symphony (1971); and thereafter, he immersed himself in early music, re-investigating the roots of Western music. He studied plainsong, Gregorian chant, and the emergence of polyphony in the European Renaissance.

    The music that began to emerge after this period was radically different. This period of new compositions included Fratres, Cantus In Memoriam Benjamin Britten, and Tabula Rasa.[3] Pärt describes the music of this period as tintinnabuli — like the ringing of bells. Spiegel im Spiegel (1978) is a well-known example which has been used in many films. The music is characterized by simple harmonies, often single unadorned notes, or triads, which form the basis of Western harmony. These are reminiscent of ringing bells. Tintinnabuli works are rhythmically simple and do not change tempo. The influence of early European music is clear.[citation needed] Another characteristic of Pärt's later works is that they are frequently settings for sacred texts, although he mostly chooses Latin or the Church Slavonic language used in Orthodox liturgy instead of his native Estonian language. Large-scale works inspired by religious texts include St. John Passion, Te Deum, and Litany. Choral works from this period include Magnificat and The Beatitudes.[3]

    But yet if you listen to Holy Harmony you may understand what I mean .

    The entire piece can be downloaded here :

    rapidshare.com Jonathan_Goldman_Holy_Harmony_01_Holy_Harmony.mp3

    I'm downloading it. Thank you.


    Those two pieces were so soul filling that I'll leave the Te deum for tomorrow Cheerful

    Since you like it so much, I uploaded my high quality version of the Te Deum for you:
    rapidshare.com 01-Te_Deum.mp3
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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Fri Jul 23, 2010 2:58 pm

    metaw3 wrote:
    Since you like it so much, I uploaded my high quality version of the Te Deum for you:
    rapidshare.com 01-Te_Deum.mp3

    Thank you metaw for your kindness .
    I love this composer .
    I am finding each one of these pieces quite unique .
    I would say it's contemplative music .. a state I like to be in.

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Fri Jul 23, 2010 3:02 pm

    Franz Schubert
    Agnus dei




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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Sat Jul 24, 2010 4:24 pm



    Last edited by mudra on Mon Aug 09, 2010 8:15 am; edited 1 time in total
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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Sat Jul 24, 2010 7:15 pm

    Giovanni Battista Pergolesi _ Stabat Mater

    Sorry neither Safari nor Firefox are willing to take the playlist URL so I can embed it.

    http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=FBB1E9C5A6E29FB4

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  newel on Sat Jul 24, 2010 10:32 pm

    I listened to the Harmony piece and yes it sounds like Part in its Gregorian aspect.

    BWV 1056 Largo / BWV 156 Sinfonia

    Bach used this music in 2 works. First in 1729 as the sinfonia (intro) for a cantata (BWV 156). It is often played on a wind instrument. Later in 1742 he reused it in a harpsichord concerto (BWV 1056). I think he used it also in a violin concerto that was lost. Many people see no less than the meaning of life in this music. You can see it from the comments on youtube. It is certainly one of the pieces that brought me to the most high places. I was on youtube all evening hunting down the best versions and I made this playlist:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6LNdz43a1I&feature=PlayList&p=91A5A6402D41AC54&playnext_from=PL&index=0&playnext=1

    <object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/p/91A5A6402D41AC54&hl=en_US&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/p/91A5A6402D41AC54&hl=en_US&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="480" height="385" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:33 pm

    Thank you so much for taking the time to put so much beauty together metaw.
    This piece is a jewel that stands out on its own .
    To me Bach caught the breath of life itself ...that delicate loving flow
    that arises when stillness of mind is reached and spirit shines ...
    much in the same way as flowers open their petals to reveal their inner beauty .



    My favorite interpretation is the one on the cello of Martin Ostertag and Boris Björn.
    An instrument whose sound I particularly like .
    The harmonica solo was very warm .
    The guitar piece of Juergen Schenk very beautifull too.

    I'll continue listening to this later on as of now it's like with smelling perfumes... there is a point you have to take a pause .

    Have you had a chance to watch that Schubert documentary ? I have found it great.

    Much love from me
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    Re: Former Times Music

    Post  mudra on Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:36 pm

    Yo-Ma - Bach's Cello Suite N°1



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