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    Our legacy to future generations

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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:20 pm

    Full scale of plastic in the world's oceans revealed for first time

    Over five trillion pieces of plastic are floating in our oceans says most comprehensive study to date on plastic pollution around the world

    More than five trillion pieces of plastic, collectively weighing nearly 269,000 tonnes, are floating in the world’s oceans, causing damage throughout the food chain, new research has found.
    Data collected by scientists from the US, France, Chile, Australia and New Zealand suggests a minimum of 5.25tn plastic particles in the oceans, most of them “micro plastics” measuring less than 5mm.

    The volume of plastic pieces, largely deriving from products such as food and drink packaging and clothing, was calculated from data taken from 24 expeditions over a six-year period to 2013. The research, published in the journal PLOS One, is the first study to look at plastics of all sizes in the world’s oceans.
    Large pieces of plastic can strangle animals such as seals, while smaller pieces are ingested by fish and then fed up the food chain, all the way to humans.

    This is problematic due to the chemicals contained within plastics, as well as the pollutants that plastic attract once they are in the marine environment.
    “We saw turtles that ate plastic bags and fish that ingested fishing lines,” said Julia Reisser, a researcher based at the University of Western Australia. “But there are also chemical impacts. When plastic gets into the water it acts like a magnet for oily pollutants.

    “Bigger fish eat the little fish and then they end up on our plates. It’s hard to tell how much pollution is being ingested but certainly plastics are providing some of it.”
    The researchers collected small plastic fragments in nets, while larger pieces were observed from boats. The northern and southern sections of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans were surveyed, as well as the Indian ocean, the coast of Australia and the Bay of Bengal.

    The vast amount of plastic, weighing 268,940 tonnes, includes everything from plastic bags to fishing gear debris.
    While spread out around the globe, much of this rubbish accumulates in five large ocean gyres, which are circular currents that churn up plastics in a set area. Each of the major oceans have plastic-filled gyres, including the well-known ‘great Pacific garbage patch’ that covers an area roughly equivalent to Texas.
    Reisser said traversing the large rubbish-strewn gyres in a boat was like sailing through “plastic soup.”
    “You put a net through it for half an hour and there’s more plastic than marine life there,” she said. “It’s hard to visualise the sheer amount, but the weight of it is more than the entire biomass of humans. It’s quite an alarming problem that’s likely to get worse.”

    read on: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/dec/10/full-scale-plastic-worlds-oceans-revealed-first-time-pollution

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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:26 pm

    The Dutch boy mopping up a sea of plastic

    Boyan Slat is a 20-year-old on a mission - to rid the world's oceans of floating plastic. He has dedicated his teenage years to finding a way of collecting it. But can the system really work - and is there any point when so much new plastic waste is still flowing into the sea every day?
    "I don't understand why 'obsessive' has a negative connotation, I'm an obsessive and I like it," says Boyan Slat. "I get an idea and I stick to it."
    This idea came to him at the age of 16, in the summer of 2011, when diving in Greece. "I saw more plastic bags than fish," says Slat. He was shocked, and even more shocked that there was no apparent solution. "Everyone said to me: 'Oh there's nothing you can do about plastic once it gets into the oceans,' and I wondered whether that was true."
    Over the last 30 to 40 years, millions of tonnes of plastic have entered the oceans. Global production of plastic now stands at 288 million tonnes per year, of which 10% ends up in the ocean in time. Most of that - 80% - comes from land-based sources. Litter gets swept into drains, and ends up in rivers - so that plastic straw or cup lid you dropped, the cigarette butt you threw on the road… they could all end up in the sea.
    The plastic is carried by currents and congregates in five revolving water systems, called gyres, in the major oceans, the most infamous being the huge Pacific Garbage Patch, half way between Hawaii and California.

    Although the concentration of plastic in these areas is high - it's sometimes described as a plastic soup - it's still spread out over an area twice the size of Texas. What's more, the plastic does not stay in one spot, it rotates. These factors make a clean-up incredibly challenging.
    "Most people have this image of an island of trash that you can almost walk on, but that's not what it's like," says Slat. "It stretches for millions of square kilometres - if you went there to try and clean up by ship it would take thousands of years." Not only that, it would be very costly in terms of both money and energy, and fish would be accidentally caught in the nets.
    Slat had always enjoyed working out solutions to puzzles, and while pondering this one, it came to him - rather than chase plastic, why not harness the currents and wait for it to come to you?
    At school, Slat developed his idea further as part of a science project. An array of floating barriers, anchored to the sea bed, would first catch and concentrate the floating debris. The plastic would move along the barriers towards a platform, where it could then be efficiently extracted. The ocean current would pass underneath the barriers, taking all buoyant sea life with it. There would be no emissions, and no nets for marine life to get entangled in. The collected ocean plastic would be recycled and made into products - or oil.
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    Computer animation of Boyan Slat's plastic catching system
    The high school science project was awarded Best Technical Design at Delft University of Technology. For most teenagers, it would probably have ended there, but Slat was different. He had been interested in engineering from a very young age. "First I built tree houses, then zip-wires, then it evolved towards bigger things," he says. "By the time I was 13, I was very interested in rocketry." This led him to set a Guinness World Record for the most water rockets launched at the same time: 213, from a sports field in his native Delft. "The experience taught me how to get people crazy enough to do things you want, and how to approach sponsors." Useful skills, as it turned out.
    When Slat began studying aerospace engineering at Delft University, the idea of cleaning up the oceans just wouldn't let him go - he says it niggled at him like "an asymmetrically positioned label" on a pair of boxer shorts. He set up a foundation, The Ocean Cleanup, and explained his concept in a TedX Talk: How the Oceans can Clean Themselves. Then, six months into his course, he made the decision to pause both university and social life to try make it a reality.
    His entire budget consisted of 200 euros (£160) of saved-up pocket money, so he spent a few desolate months trying to get sponsorship. "It was so disheartening, because no-one was interested," he says. "I remember one day contacting 300 companies for sponsorship - only one replied, and that, too, resulted in a dead end."
    Boyan Slat with some of the ocean plastic his team have collected
    But then something happened. On 26 March 2013, months after it had gone online, Slat's TedX talk went viral. "It was unbelievable," he says. "Suddenly we got hundreds of thousands of people clicking on our site every day. I received about 1,500 emails per day in my personal mailbox from people volunteering to help." He set up a crowd-funding platform that made $80,000 in 15 days.

    read on: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29631332

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    B.B.Baghor

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:43 pm

    mudra wrote:The Dutch boy mopping up a sea of plastic

    Boyan Slat is a 20-year-old on a mission - to rid the world's oceans of floating plastic. He has dedicated his teenage years to finding a way of collecting it. But can the system really work - and is there any point when so much new plastic waste is still flowing into the sea every day?
    "I don't understand why 'obsessive' has a negative connotation, I'm an obsessive and I like it," says Boyan Slat. "I get an idea and I stick to it."
    This idea came to him at the age of 16, in the summer of 2011, when diving in Greece. "I saw more plastic bags than fish," says Slat. He was shocked, and even more shocked that there was no apparent solution. "Everyone said to me: 'Oh there's nothing you can do about plastic once it gets into the oceans,' and I wondered whether that was true."
    Over the last 30 to 40 years, millions of tonnes of plastic have entered the oceans. Global production of plastic now stands at 288 million tonnes per year, of which 10% ends up in the ocean in time. Most of that - 80% - comes from land-based sources. Litter gets swept into drains, and ends up in rivers - so that plastic straw or cup lid you dropped, the cigarette butt you threw on the road… they could all end up in the sea.
    The plastic is carried by currents and congregates in five revolving water systems, called gyres, in the major oceans, the most infamous being the huge Pacific Garbage Patch, half way between Hawaii and California.

    Although the concentration of plastic in these areas is high - it's sometimes described as a plastic soup - it's still spread out over an area twice the size of Texas. What's more, the plastic does not stay in one spot, it rotates. These factors make a clean-up incredibly challenging.
    "Most people have this image of an island of trash that you can almost walk on, but that's not what it's like," says Slat. "It stretches for millions of square kilometres - if you went there to try and clean up by ship it would take thousands of years." Not only that, it would be very costly in terms of both money and energy, and fish would be accidentally caught in the nets.
    Slat had always enjoyed working out solutions to puzzles, and while pondering this one, it came to him - rather than chase plastic, why not harness the currents and wait for it to come to you?
    At school, Slat developed his idea further as part of a science project. An array of floating barriers, anchored to the sea bed, would first catch and concentrate the floating debris. The plastic would move along the barriers towards a platform, where it could then be efficiently extracted. The ocean current would pass underneath the barriers, taking all buoyant sea life with it. There would be no emissions, and no nets for marine life to get entangled in. The collected ocean plastic would be recycled and made into products - or oil.
    Jump media player
    Media player help
    Out of media player. Press enter to return or tab to continue.
    Computer animation of Boyan Slat's plastic catching system
    The high school science project was awarded Best Technical Design at Delft University of Technology. For most teenagers, it would probably have ended there, but Slat was different. He had been interested in engineering from a very young age. "First I built tree houses, then zip-wires, then it evolved towards bigger things," he says. "By the time I was 13, I was very interested in rocketry." This led him to set a Guinness World Record for the most water rockets launched at the same time: 213, from a sports field in his native Delft. "The experience taught me how to get people crazy enough to do things you want, and how to approach sponsors." Useful skills, as it turned out.
    When Slat began studying aerospace engineering at Delft University, the idea of cleaning up the oceans just wouldn't let him go - he says it niggled at him like "an asymmetrically positioned label" on a pair of boxer shorts. He set up a foundation, The Ocean Cleanup, and explained his concept in a TedX Talk: How the Oceans can Clean Themselves. Then, six months into his course, he made the decision to pause both university and social life to try make it a reality.
    His entire budget consisted of 200 euros (£160) of saved-up pocket money, so he spent a few desolate months trying to get sponsorship. "It was so disheartening, because no-one was interested," he says. "I remember one day contacting 300 companies for sponsorship - only one replied, and that, too, resulted in a dead end."
    Boyan Slat with some of the ocean plastic his team have collected
    But then something happened. On 26 March 2013, months after it had gone online, Slat's TedX talk went viral. "It was unbelievable," he says. "Suddenly we got hundreds of thousands of people clicking on our site every day. I received about 1,500 emails per day in my personal mailbox from people volunteering to help." He set up a crowd-funding platform that made $80,000 in 15 days.

    read on: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29631332

    Love Always
    mudra

    Thank you for sharing this, mudra Candle in the Wind I like what this boy Boyan Slat says about his "obsession".To be single minded and focussed on one goal
    is perfectly okay to me, but probably somewhat rare to find in those who manipulate virtual gadgets for long periods of time. It's a true
    inspiration and joy, to see how Boyan's initiative is like a butterfly wing, on the move on one side of the globe, causing a storm.... of support,
    on the other half Thubs Up Waking up isn't hard to do anymore, or so it seems in this case.
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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Thu Jul 16, 2015 3:47 pm

    What is Wrong With Our Culture

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=90&v=YMDu3JdQ8Ow


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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Jul 25, 2015 5:16 am

    S.A.L.T
    The sustainable alternative lightning project


    Rural communities in the Philippines will soon be trading in candles and battery-powered devices
    for lamps which run on salt water.



    Arrow http://inhabitat.com/filipino-salt-lamp-runs-8-hours-on-just-1-glass-of-salty-water/

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    B.B.Baghor

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Sat Jul 25, 2015 12:58 pm

    mudra wrote:
    One Human Family, Food for All

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhU5JEd-XRo


    Love Always
    mudra

    Powerful video, thank you mudra Flowers
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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Jul 25, 2015 3:15 pm

    You are welcome BB.
    Thank you for your visit :)

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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sun Aug 02, 2015 4:53 pm

    Longest Floating Structure In History Sets Out To Clean The Ocean In 2016!

    An ambitious new project is hoping to help clean the world's oceans with a trash collector that is reportedly the longest floating structure in recorded world history.

    Back in 2013 we reported that a 19-year-old developed a plan to clean up the world’s oceans in just 5 years, removing 7,250,000 tons of plastic. However, last week, Boyan Slat (now 20), founder and CEO of The Ocean Cleanup, announced that this awesome project will be deployed in 2016.

    Slat’s invention consists of an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms that could be dispatched to garbage patches around the world. Working with the flow of nature, his solution to the problematic shifting of trash is to have the array span the radius of a garbage patch, acting as a giant funnel as the ocean moves through it. The angle of the booms would force plastic in the direction of the platforms, where it would be separated from smaller forms, such as plankton, and be filtered and stored for recycling. The issue of by-catches, killing life forms in the procedure of cleaning trash, can be virtually eliminated by using booms instead of nets and it will result in a larger areas covered. Because of trash’s density compared to larger sea animals, the use of booms will allow creatures to swim under the booms unaffected, reducing wildlife death substantially.


    Read More: http://www.trueactivist.com/longest-floating-structure-in-history-sets-out-to-clean-the-ocean-in-2016/?utm_source=fb&utm_medium=fb&utm_campaign=sh

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Wed Aug 05, 2015 1:41 pm

    Innovative hospital farm provides fresh, nutritious food to patients

    Nutrition plays such an important role in personal health that it makes sense to prioritize the quality of diet in hospitals. The question is, why as has it taken so long?

    “Let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.” – Hippocrates

    When my mother underwent a major surgery, she begged me to come cook for her as soon as she got out of the hospital. The food she received while in recovery was so tasteless, stale, and seemingly devoid of nutrients that she thought she would suffer from malnutrition before recovering from the surgery. I stayed with her for weeks, cooking meal after meal with produce from her huge kitchen garden, helping to heal her with nutritious and delicious food.

    “That’s why I recovered as quickly as I did,” she told me four years later. “I don’t know how hospitals can get away with serving such awful food to sick patients – the very people who need nourishing meals more than ever.”

    One hospital has caught on to this basic concept, realizing that patients should be well fed in order to recover better and to learn about the importance of good nutrition. St. Luke’s University Hospital partnered with the Rodale Institute (a groundbreaking leader in organic agriculture research) to create an ‘hospital farm’ on its Anderson campus in Easton, Pennsylvania.

    read on: Arrow http://www.treehugger.com/health/innovative-hospital-farm-provides-fresh-nutritious-food-patients.html

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Sep 05, 2015 7:18 am

    A Legacy of Destruction: Monsanto’s Dark History Exposed in Stunning New Photo Essay

    The Monsanto Company has been active for over 100 years in the United States, and yet the St. Louis based genetically modified seed and chemical giant’s long legacy of nefarious actions has only recently come into public view.

    The mainstream in America is just now waking up to the destruction caused to humans, animals and the environment by Monsanto after all these years, but for the people living in communities that have been damaged and even destroyed by the corporation’s unscrupulous practices, the harsh truth has been ever-present (see this ‘Timeline of Crime’ for more on the dark history of Monsanto from the Children of Vietnam Veterans Health Alliance’s page).

    In an effort to document Monsanto’s toxic legacy, photographer Mathieu Asselin spent three years traveling across the United States capturing images of the people whose lives been most deeply affected, and in some cases destroyed, by the monstrous chemical company that happens to control much of our food supply (and key positions in our government, not so coincidentally).

    Asselin, who is planning to finish his project titled ‘Monsanto: A Photographic Investigation’ with visits to both Tu Du Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam (to see the consequences of the use of Monsanto’s Agent Orange during the Vietnam War firsthand); and to the Svalbard Global Seed Bank in Norway where seeds from all around the world are stored as a backup plan in large part due to the rise of genetically modified seeds, is raising money in hopes of making these trips.

    You can click on this link to support Mathieu’s project financially; in the meantime check out his hauntingly beautiful work below.

    - See more at: http://althealthworks.com/3951/man-travels-across-u-s-documents-destruction-for-monsanto-a-photographic-investigation/#sthash.AK7sl3h6.dpuf

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Sep 11, 2015 3:47 am

    Texas teenager creates $20 water purifier to tackle toxic e-waste pollution

    Consumer electronics, including computers and mobiles, are leaving a legacy of toxic waste in countries including China and India. Recycling factories across Asia are recovering e-waste exported from around the world, but discharging heavy metals and chemicals into local water supplies in the process.

    How to safeguard drinking water for local residents is an ongoing battle, with existing solutions such as chlorination, distillation, boiling and high-tech filtration prohibitively expensive and often reliant on fossil fuels.

    Now a new filtering device, invented by a US teenager, could provide a cheap and easy way to purify water.

    The renewable heavy metal filter, designed by 18-year-old Perry Alagappan, removes 99% of heavy metals from water that passes through it. The filter, built from graphene nanotubes, can be rinsed with a vinegar concentrate and reused. The highly concentrated waste can then be evaporated, leaving a deposit of pure metal that can be used in many different applications.

    Alagappan, who was awarded the Stockholm Junior Water Prize at this year’s World Water Week, said the filter cost an estimated $20 (£13) to make, up to five times less than existing reverse osmosis technology.

    read on: http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2015/aug/27/texas-teenager-water-purifier-toxic-e-waste-pollution#img-1

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Thu Jan 28, 2016 4:13 am

    The Magnetic Wand That Cleans Oil Spills

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYM324yDH-Q


    Oil spills are an unavoidable part of our future on this planet. Until we no longer have to rely on the messy stuff, we will still have to pump oil and ship it around the world, and drilling and shipping inevitably means spills.

    In this season of Upgrade, we head out to Fermilab, the nation's premier particle physics laboratory, to talk to Arden Warner. Warner, whose day job as a physicist consists of colliding high speed particles together, thought of a unique way to clean up oil spills—using magnets.

    Warner said he figured there had to be a way to organically magnetize spilled oil, which could then be magnetically collected. He showed us how to do this by adding the naturally-occurring magnetic mineral magnetite to spilled oil, which allows that oil to more easily be manipulated and captured than by other methods. We also take a look at how he has implemented these simple principles into an electromagnetic boom that could be used to change the future of oil spill recovery.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sun Feb 07, 2016 3:20 pm

    Why This Farmer Refused To Plow His Land

    How a “do nothing” approach to farming yields more food and happier people.

    “the ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.”



    As a young man in the 1930s, Masanobu Fukuoka worked in the city of Yokohama, Japan, as a plant researcher. Once on an evening walk, weak from a bout of pneumonia, he collapsed. “Everything that had possessed me, all the agonies, disappeared like dreams and illusions,” he later wrote in The One-Straw Revolution, a book that’s one part practical growing handbook and part Buddhist opus. “And something one might call ‘true nature’ stood revealed.” Fukuoka couldn’t fathom a return to modern life. So he spent the next seven decades, until his death in 2008, pursuing that vision of true nature by farming his family’s land on Japan’s southern island of Shikoku.


    On his small commercial plot, he rejected machinery, chemicals, compost, and all forms of manmade order, believing that with minimal input, nature’s methods would trump modern society’s. His rice plants sprouted dense, golden heads of grain; the yields from his paddies surpassed those of conventional farms. The straw he spread around to smother weeds eventually decomposed and fed the soil underneath. He scattered vegetable seeds through his mandarin orchard, and thick daikon roots and ruffled mustard greens grew wherever conditions were right. His tangled trees hung with sweet, juicy fruits. “When you walked through his orchard, you didn’t see a human creation,” says Larry Korn, Fukuoka’s longtime student and the editor of Fukuoka’s seminal first book. “You were looking directly at nature.”

    read on: Arrow http://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/garden/why-this-farmer-refused-to-plow-his-land?cid=soc_Rodale%27s+Organic+Life+-+RodalesOrganicLife_FBPAGE_Rodale%27s+Organic+Life__

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Thu Feb 18, 2016 2:56 pm

    Facing Severe Food Shortages, Venezuela Pushes Urban Gardens



    Last week, opposition lawmakers in Venezuela declared a "food emergency." That's because Venezuela is facing widespread shortages of milk, meat, bread and other staples. Critics blame the government's socialist economic policies. But instead of changing course, President Nicolás Maduro is calling on Venezuelans to help feed themselves — by starting urban gardens.

    Josefina Requena is among those who have heeded Maduro's call. Cucumbers, green pepper, passion fruit and other produce grow in the front yard of her home in a slum in Caracas, the Venezuelan capital. She also has a chicken coop.

    read on: Arrow http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/02/16/466942128/facing-severe-food-shortages-venezuela-pushes-urban-gardens

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Thu Jun 02, 2016 10:39 am

    Ruby Chimerica on the Hopi Reservation, Arizona

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2C5XEKQxt4


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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  Pris on Thu Jun 02, 2016 4:08 pm

    mudra wrote:Ruby Chimerica on the Hopi Reservation, Arizona

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2C5XEKQxt4


    Love Always
    mudra

    That's a sweet message... I love you
    .
    .
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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Jun 03, 2016 2:04 am

    Pris wrote:

    That's a sweet message... I love you
    .
    .

    Thank you Pris.I felt same about Ruby and thought it was great someone shared her words that they may reach far and touch people in soul and Heart I love you

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  Pris on Fri Jun 03, 2016 10:11 pm

    mudra wrote:
    One Human Family, Food for All

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhU5JEd-XRo


    Love Always
    mudra

    This is GREAT!  Thank you for posting it, mudra!

    Exclamation

    Shoot... I was going to share it on one of my threads, but it's connected to the Catholic Church. Crying or Very sad

    .
    .
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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Jun 04, 2016 1:39 pm

    Pris wrote:
    This is GREAT!  Thank you for posting it, mudra!

    Exclamation

    Shoot... I was going to share it on one of my threads, but it's connected to the Catholic Church. Crying or Very sad

    .
    .

    You yourself are a Cat Holic Pris aren't you ? Wink

    Love from me
    mudra
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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  Pris on Sat Jun 04, 2016 8:08 pm

    mudra wrote:
    Pris wrote:
    This is GREAT!  Thank you for posting it, mudra!

    Exclamation

    Shoot... I was going to share it on one of my threads, but it's connected to the Catholic Church. Crying or Very sad

    .
    .

    You yourself are a  Cat Holic Pris aren't you ?  Wink

    Love from me
    mudra

    .
    .

    Very witty, mudra!  I'm impressed!! Wink Whistle Insanely Happy
    .
    .
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    mudra

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Wed Jul 27, 2016 5:57 pm

    World’s Largest Purifier

    36-year-old entrepreneur Daan Roosegaarde first thought of this solution when visiting the Chinese capital two years ago. The smog made it impossible for him to admire the city from his hotel room on the thirty-second floor of a building.
    Consequently, he designed the Smog Free Tower, a seven-meter high tower that uses just 1,400 watts of electricity per hour — as much as a tea kettle — to clear some 30,000 cubic meters of air. The tower uses ion technology to capture small pollution particles including PM2.5 and PM10, and to release clean air. The surrounding area is 75% cleaner after the Smog Free Tower processes the air.

    “Basically, it’s like when you have a plastic balloon, and you polish it with your hand, it becomes static, electrically charged, and it attracts your hair,” the artist says.
    A trial is set to start in Beijing, China this September. In addition to removing pollutants from the air that could otherwise find their way into human lungs and blood, the city air purifier also turns smog into jewelry.

    The smog is compressed into diamond-like jewelry, which is a byproduct of the process. Compressed smog particles are sealed in a resin cube after being put under pressure for 30 minutes, and the resulting objects can be used in jewelry such as rings and cufflinks, which are already being sold.

    Arrow http://secretenergy.com/news/worlds-largest-purifier/

    Love Always
    mudra
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    Pris

    Posts : 1889
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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  Pris on Sat Jul 30, 2016 3:55 am

    mudra wrote:World’s Largest Purifier

    36-year-old entrepreneur Daan Roosegaarde first thought of this solution when visiting the Chinese capital two years ago. The smog made it impossible for him to admire the city from his hotel room on the thirty-second floor of a building.
    Consequently, he designed the Smog Free Tower, a seven-meter high tower that uses just 1,400 watts of electricity per hour — as much as a tea kettle — to clear some 30,000 cubic meters of air. The tower uses ion technology to capture small pollution particles including PM2.5 and PM10, and to release clean air. The surrounding area is 75% cleaner after the Smog Free Tower processes the air.

    “Basically, it’s like when you have a plastic balloon, and you polish it with your hand, it becomes static, electrically charged, and it attracts your hair,” the artist says.
    A trial is set to start in Beijing, China this September. In addition to removing pollutants from the air that could otherwise find their way into human lungs and blood, the city air purifier also turns smog into jewelry.

    The smog is compressed into diamond-like jewelry, which is a byproduct of the process. Compressed smog particles are sealed in a resin cube after being put under pressure for 30 minutes, and the resulting objects can be used in jewelry such as rings and cufflinks, which are already being sold.

    Arrow http://secretenergy.com/news/worlds-largest-purifier/

    Love Always
    mudra


    They call this a solution?  What a f***ed up world!  So long as you're making money (and jewellery!) -- profiting off a bad situation and not actually eliminating the cause of the problem, they'll leave you alone.  This is okay?  This is NOT okay. Nope
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    mudra

    Posts : 18366
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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Jul 30, 2016 4:33 am

    Pris wrote:


    They call this a solution?  What a f***ed up world!  So long as you're making money (and jewellery!) -- profiting off a bad situation and not actually eliminating the cause of the problem, they'll leave you alone.  This is okay?  This is NOT okay. Nope
    .
    .

    These types of solutions are indeed what allopathy is to homeopathy.

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    mudra
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    Pris

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    Join date : 2015-04-24

    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  Pris on Sat Jul 30, 2016 4:38 am

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    Exactly. Crying or Very sad
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