Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

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    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Sun Apr 14, 2013 6:22 pm

    Owen Desposyni, Archdruid & Prince Bard
    is your 47th great grandfather

    http://www.geni.com/people/Owen-Desposyni/6000000000172756221?through=6000000003827288033

    Viviane del Acqs, Queen of Burgundy Lady of The Lake

    is your 47th great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Viviane-del-Acqs/6000000019994383181?through=6000000000172756221

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Sun Apr 14, 2013 7:37 pm

    ALTHOUGH, this does run into 'real' lineage (see below)

    Beli "The Great", King of Britain is your 56th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Beli-The-Great-King-of-Britain/6000000002709559312?through=6000000003828405347

    Anna (or Dôn) verch Mathonwy is your 56th great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Anna-or-D%C3%B4n-verch-Mathonwy/298314988370002517?through=6000000002709559312

    Mathonwy is your 57th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Mathonwy/6000000017806261022?through=298314988370002517

    ************************************************************************************

    Elzasus (Fictional) is your 54th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Elzasus-Fictional/6000000002396371068?through=311819849410001450


    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You

    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother

    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father

    JAMES HANDY
    his father

    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother

    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father

    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father

    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father

    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father

    John Ruthven
    his father

    George Ruthven
    his father

    William Ruthven
    his father

    William Ruthven
    his father

    Sir William Ruthven
    his father

    William Ruthven, 2nd Lord of Ruthven
    his father

    Catherine Gray of Buttergask - Stewart - Ruthven
    his mother

    Elisabeth Stewart, Countess of Argyll
    her mother

    John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl
    her father

    James Stewart, the Black Knight of Lorn
    his father

    Sir John Stewart of Innermeath
    his father

    Sir Robert Stewart
    his father

    Sir James Stewart
    his father

    John Stewart, Lord of Bonkyll
    his father

    Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland
    his father

    Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland
    his father

    Alan Fitz Walter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland
    his father

    Walter FitzAlan, 1st High Steward of Scotland
    his father

    Alan Fitz Flaad
    his father

    Flaald, Seneschal de Dol en Bretagne
    his father

    Alain FitzFlaald, Seneschal of Dol
    his father

    Flaald de Dol, Seneschal of Dol
    his father

    Aimon I, vicomte de Dinan
    his father

    Binidic "Castellin"
    his father

    Budic de Cornouaille, I, Prince
    his father

    Diles de Cornouaille, Prince Cornwall
    his father

    Ulfret de Cornouaille, Prince Cornwall
    his father

    Alfrond de Cornouaille
    his father


    Justin de Cornouaille, Pr Cornouille
    his father

    Constantine Cornouaille, Prince of Cornwall
    his father

    Judon Ap Concar, Pr. Cornouille
    his father

    Concar ap Gradlon, Prince of Cornwall
    his father

    Gradlon Ap Judicael
    his father

    Saint Judicael
    his father

    Hoël III de Cornouaille, roi de Bretagne
    his father

    Alain ap Hoel Fychan, I, King of Brittany
    his father

    Hoël ap Hoël Mawr, II, King of Brittany
    his father

    Hoël ap Emyr Llydaw, I, King of Brittany
    his father

    Elaine verch Gwyrlys
    his mother

    Igerna ferch Amlawdd, of Dumnonia
    her mother

    Owen Desposyni, Archdruid & Prince Bard is your 47th Great Grandfather
    her father
    Owen Archdruid & Prince Bard Desposyni (Taliesin), Archdruid & Prince Bard

    Birth: circa 520
    Death: 540 (20)
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Lambor (Fictional) and Wife of Lambor

    Husband of Viviane del Acqs, queen of burgundy Lady of the Lake; Roselinda and Amlawdd D Acqs, Queen of Avalon

    Father of Igerna ferch Amlawdd, of Dumnonia; nimue dar of taliesin; Alboin (Bors); Morgause del Acqs; Viviane del Acqs, Queen of Avallon; and Ygerna del Acqs « less

    Brother of Taliesen Merlin; Pellam (Fictional) and Eglise / Yglais (Fictional)

    Added by:
    Ricardo Alejandro Seminario Leòn on December 11, 2007
    Managed by:
    Bjørn P. Brox and 15 others
    http://www.geni.com/people/Owen-Desposyni/6000000000172756221?through=6000000000172760546



    Lambor (Fictional)is your 48th great grandfather
    his father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Lambor-Fictional/6000000000172760546?through=6000000018407667371

    Zambor / Zamphir is your 49th great grandfather
    his father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Zambor-Zamphir/6000000003645825734?through=6000000003645825739

    Pucelle aux Blanches is your 49th great grandmother
    http://www.geni.com/people/Pucelle-aux-Blanches/6000000018407667371?through=6000000003645825734


    Nascien II is your 50th great grandfather
    his father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Nascien-II/6000000003645825739?through=6000000003828405335

    Narpus is your 51st great grandfather.
    his father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Narpus/6000000003828405335?through=6000000005440195794

    Celedoin is your 52nd great grandfather.
    his father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Celedoin/6000000005440195794?through=6000000011261993305

    Sarrasinte is your 52nd great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Sarrasinte/6000000011261993305?through=6000000005440195794

    Nasciens I (Fictional)is your 53rd great grandfather
    his father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Nasciens-I-Fictional/311819849410001450?through=6000000003828405353

    Flegetine is your 53rd great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Flegetine/6000000003828405353?through=6000000005440195794

    Elzasus (Fictional) is your 54th great grandfather.
    his father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Elzasus-Fictional/6000000002396371068?through=311819849410001450

    ... de Sarras is your 54th great grandmother.

    Evelake, King of Sarras (Fictional) is your 55th great grandfather.


    Beli "The Great", King of Britain is your 56th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Beli-The-Great-King-of-Britain/6000000002709559312?through=6000000003828405347

    Anna (or Dôn) verch Mathonwy is your 56th great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Anna-or-D%C3%B4n-verch-Mathonwy/298314988370002517?through=6000000002709559312

    Mathonwy is your 57th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Mathonwy/6000000017806261022?through=298314988370002517



    Last edited by THEeXchanger on Sun Apr 14, 2013 8:50 pm; edited 2 times in total

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Sun Apr 14, 2013 7:37 pm

    Viviane del Acqs, Queen of Burgundy - Lady of The Lake
    is your 47th great grandmother


    http://www.geni.com/people/Viviane-del-Acqs/6000000019994383181?through=6000000000172756221

    goes up to:
    Dardanus King of Arcadia is your 119th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Dardanus-King-of-Arcadia/6000000006375582740?through=6000000007236373288

    Dardanus King of Arcadia is your 119th great grandfather.


    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You


    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother

    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father

    JAMES HANDY
    his father

    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother

    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father

    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father

    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father

    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father

    John Ruthven
    his father

    George Ruthven
    his father

    William Ruthven
    his father

    William Ruthven
    his father

    Sir William Ruthven
    his father

    William Ruthven, 2nd Lord of Ruthven
    his father

    Catherine Gray of Buttergask - Stewart - Ruthven
    his mother

    Elisabeth Stewart, Countess of Argyll
    her mother

    John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl
    her father

    Joan Beaufort, Queen consort of Scots
    his mother

    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset
    her father

    John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster
    his father

    Philippa of Hainault, Queen consort of England
    his mother

    Guillaume III de Hainaut, graaf van Holland
    her father

    Philippa de Luxembourg
    his mother

    Hendrik IV, hertog van Limburg
    her father

    Ermesinde de Namur, comtesse de Luxembourg
    his mother

    Agnes of Guelders
    her mother

    Hendrik van Gelre, graaf van Gelre en Zutphen
    her father

    Ermengarde van Zutphen
    his mother

    Otto II, graaf van Zütphen
    her father

    Adelheid van Zütphen
    his mother

    Ludolph von Lothringen, Herr zu Waldenburg un Zütphen
    her father

    Mathilde von Sachsen, Princess of the Holy Roman Empire
    his mother

    Otto II Holy Roman Emperor
    her father

    Otto I "der Große" von Sachsen, Römischer Kaiser
    his father

    Heinrich I 'der Vogler' von Sachsen
    his father

    Otto I, Duke of Saxony
    his father

    Liudolf I "the Great", Herzog von Sachsen
    his father

    Bruno III Von Wettin, Duke of Saxony
    his father

    Ida of Autun
    his mother

    Aude of Austrasia
    her mother

    Charles "Martel", Prince of the Franks
    her father

    Pepin II d'Héristal, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
    his father

    Ansigisel de Metz, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia
    his father

    Saint Arnoul, Bishop of Metz
    his father

    Bodegiesel II, Duke of Aquitaine
    his father

    Saint Gondolfus, Bishop of Tongres
    his father

    Mundéric, Lord of Vitry-en-Perthois
    his father

    Clodéric "the Parricide", King of the Franks at Cologne
    his father

    Siegbert I, King of the Franks at Cologne
    his father

    Chlodébaud, King of the Franks at Cologne
    his father

    Chlodégar, King of the Franks at Cologne
    his father

    Blesinde von Köln
    his mother

    Chlodio IV, King of the Franks at Cologne
    her father

    Dagobert II, King of the Salian Franks
    his father

    Génébaud II, Duke of the Salian Franks
    his father

    Dagobert I 'Magnus', Duke of the Salian Franks
    his father

    Gauthier, King of the Sicambrian Franks
    his father

    Chlodius III, King of the Sicambrian Franks
    his father

    Bartherus, King of the Franks
    his father

    Childéric, King of the Franks
    his father

    Sunno, King of the Franks
    his father

    Farabert, King of the Franks
    his father

    Clodomir IV, King of the Franks
    his father

    Marcomir IV, King of the Franks
    his father

    Odomir IV, King of the Sicambrian Franks
    his father

    Richemer I, King of the Sicambrian Franks
    his father

    Ratherius, King of the Franks
    his father

    Antenor IV (III), King of the Franks
    his father

    Chlodomir III, King of the West Franks
    his father

    Marcomir III, King of the West Franks
    his father

    Chlodio II, King of the West Franks
    his father

    Francio, King of the West Franks
    his father

    Antharius, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Cassander, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Merodocus, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Clodomir II, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Antenor II (III), King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Chlodius I, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Marocmir II, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Nicanor, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Clodomir I, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Bassanus Magnus, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Diocles, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Helenus V, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Priamos V, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Antenor II, King of the Sicambrii
    his father

    Marcomir I / II, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Antenor IV / II, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Helenus IV, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Priamos IV, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Marcomir I, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Dilulius II, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Plaserius III, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Helenus III / II, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Dilulius I, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Almadius I, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Gentilanor V, King of the Cimmerians
    his father

    Priamos III, King of Troy
    his father

    Alexandros, King of Troy
    his father

    Basabelian II, King of Troy
    his father

    Plesron II, King of Troy
    his father

    Helenus II, King of Troy
    his father

    Priamos II, King of Troy
    his father

    Antenor I, King of Troy
    his father

    Plaserius II, King of Troy
    his father

    Zaberian, King of Troy
    his father

    Eliacor I, King of Troy
    his father

    Plesron I, King of Troy
    his father

    Plaserius I, King of Troy
    his father

    Basabelian I, King of Troy
    his father

    Zelius, King of Troy
    his father

    Esdron, King of Troy
    his father

    Francus, King of Troy
    his father

    Cestrinus, King of Troy
    his father

    Helenos I, King of Epirus
    his father

    Priam, King of Troy
    his father

    Laomedon, King of Troy
    his father

    llus, King of Troy
    his father

    Tros, King of Troy
    his father

    Erichthonius, King of Dardania
    his father

    Dardanus King of Arcadia is your 119th great grandfather
    his father

    (still have to come back down, and, pick up the female/male side)
    http://www.geni.com/people/Dardanus-King-of-Arcadia/6000000006375582740?through=6000000007236373288


    Last edited by THEeXchanger on Sun Apr 14, 2013 9:14 pm; edited 1 time in total

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Sun Apr 14, 2013 7:48 pm

    http://www.geni.com/people/Dardanus-King-of-Arcadia/6000000006375582740?through=6000000000424692724

    Dardanus King of Arcadia is your 119th great grandfather.

    Greek mythology, Dardanus ("burner up") founder of the city of Dardania

    this person is referenced as same person

    http://www.geni.com/profile/index/6000000006743547923

    1 Chronicles 2:6 - http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt25a02.htm#6

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardanus

    While many "sources" claim biblical Dara and Dardanus are the same person,
    this is VERY sloppy genealogy,
    as Dardanus lived at least 800 years after the times-frame for Dara.
    But so be it.

    Birth Date c. -1519 or -1710

    Death Date: -1414 or -1449

    --------------------

    "Zerah's son Ethan, very wise, and indeed this line of Judah- Zerah
    is the only royal line termed wise, on the other hand led his people north,
    from Egypt where he was born, into what is now Asia Minor,
    and his son Mahol continued likewise.

    Mahol's heir, Darda, reached the western shore,
    where on a commanding site; he founded the metropolis of Troy.

    The date is 1520 B.C. Here the city flourished for nearly four hundred years.

    Darda first saw the straits that separated Europe and Asia and gave them his name, Dardanelles.

    Darda also founded a fort here that is named after him.

    But the greatest honor is recorded in the Bible,
    Solomon was 'wiser than all men; than ... Darda the son of Mahol.'

    Thus great were the founder of Troy and the sire of the Trojan race
    whose children abide with us still.

    Troy fell because her sons had an eye for the refined and beautiful in women.

    Her descendants have that exquisite eye still
    and are naturally very proud of the accomplishment.

    source:http://users.mo-net.com/mlindste/ce092003.html

    --------------------

    King Darda (Dardanus) Of DARDANIA

    Born: Troy, Turkey

    Marriage: Princess Batea Of TEUCRI

    Died: Abt 1414 B.C., Rameses, Goshen, Egypt

    Spouses/Children:

    Princess Batea Of TEUCRI

    Erichthonius Of TROY+

    General Notes:

    Death noted on Lewis Ancestry as 1414 BC Hecataeus of Abdera,
    a fourth-century B.C. Greek historian,
    states that "Now the Egyptians say that also after these events
    [the plagues of Exodus] a great number of colonies were SPREAD FROM EGYPT
    all over the inhabited world...

    They say also that those who set forth with DANAUS,
    likewise from Egypt, settled what is practically the oldest city of Greece,
    Argos, and that the nations of the COLCHI IN PONTUS
    and that of the Jews (remnant of Judah),
    which lies BETWEEN ARABIA AND SYRIA,
    were founded as colonies by certain emigrants from their country [Egypt];
    and this is the reason why it is a long-established institution
    among these peoples to CIRCUMCISE their male children,
    the custom having been brought over FROM EGYPT.

    Even the ATHENIANS, they say, are colonists from SAIS IN EGYPT."
    (Quoted from Diodorus of Sicily.
    G. H. Oldfather, 1933. Vol I, bks I-II, 1-34, p.91).

    An examination of some of the historical clues reveals that there lived in Egypt -- during the time of the bondage of the Israelites
    -- a man named DARDA.

    According to E. Raymond Capt, "Darda, "the Egyptian," (son of Zarah)
    was "DARDANUS," the EGYPTIAN FOUNDER OF TROY."
    (Jacob's Pillar. Artisan Sales, Thousand Oaks, CA. 1977. P. 25).

    The early migration of Darda is noted in the book How Israel Came to Britain: Actually, groups of Israelites began to migrate away
    from the main body BEFORE THE ISRAEL NATION WAS FORMED
    -- while, as a people, they were STILL IN BONDAGE IN EGYPT.

    One of these groups under the leadership of Calcol,
    a prince of the tribe of Judah,
    went westward across the Mediterranean eventually settling in Ulster [Ireland].

    ANOTHER, under the leadership of DARDANUS, a brother of Calcol,
    CROSSED TO ASIA MINOR to found the Kingdom later known as TROY.
    -- Canadian British Israel Assn. Windsor, Ontario. P.2.

    Darda married Princess Batea Of TEUCRI,
    daughter of King Teucer Of The TROJANS and Unknown.
    (Princess Batea Of TEUCRI was born in 1327 B.C. in Troy, Turkey.)

    Dardanus

    The son of Zeus </articles/z/zeus.html> and Electra </articles/e/electra.html>.

    He sailed from Samothrace to Troas in a raft made of hides.

    He eventually married Batea, the daughter of King Teucer
    </articles/t/teucer.html>, who gave him land near Abydos.

    There he founded the city of Dardania (the later, ill-fated city of Troy).
    Related information

    Other names Dardanos Etymology "Burner up"
    Send comment Print article <javascript:void(0);> Cite article <javascript:void(0);> Previous page <javascript:history.back(1);>

    Hence the name Dardanelles for what was once called the Hellespont.

    Source(s):

    Encyclopedie van de Mythologie.

    Brewer's Book of Myth and Legend.

    --------------------

    Gen 93:

    Darda Dardanus, King of Dardania, son of Zara and Electra,
    was born in Ramses, Goshen Egypt.

    He married Batea Asia Ilium.

    Batea Asia Ilium.

    http://www.geocities.com/familyretzlaff/denmark.html

    Dardan

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search

    This article is about the terms Dardan and Dardanian in classical writings.

    For the Shannara character, see Dardan (Shannara).

    See also: Dardani

    The terms Dardan and Dardanian in classical writings were synonymous
    with the term Trojan, the Dardans being Trojans,
    an ancient people of the Troad in northwestern Anatolia.

    The Dardans derived their name from Dardanus,
    the mythical founder of Dardania (Asia minor),
    an ancient city in the Troad.

    Rule of the Troad was divided between Dardania and Troy.

    Homer makes a clear distinction between the Trojans and the Dardanians.[1]

    The Royal House of Troy was also divided into two branches,
    that of Dardania, and that of Troy (or Ilium).

    The House of Dardania was older than the House of Troy,
    but Troy later became more powerful than Dardania.

    Aeneas is referred to in Virgil's Aeneid interchangeably
    as a Dardan or as a Trojan,
    but strictly speaking Aeneas was of the Dardanian branch.

    Many rulers of Rome claimed descent from Aeneas
    and the Houses of Troy and Dardania.

    The strait of the Dardanelles was named after the Dardans,
    who lived in the region.

    The ethnic affinities of the Dardans (and Trojans)
    and the nature of their language remain a mystery.

    The remains of their material culture reveal close ties with Thracians,
    other Anatolian groups, and Greek contact.

    Archaeological finds from the Troad dating back to the Chalcolithic period
    show striking affinity to archaeological finds known from the same era
    in Muntenia and Moldavia, and there are other traces which suggest
    close ties between the Troad and the Carpatho-Balkan region of Europe.

    Archaeologists in fact have stated that the styles of certain ceramic objects and bone figurines show that these objects were brought into the Troad by Carpatho-Danubian colonists; for example,
    certain ceramic objects have been shown to have Cucuteni origins [2].
    They are totally unrelated to the later Thraco-Illyrian tribe
    of the same name [3].

    [edit] References

    1. ^ "Review: Some Recent Works on Ancient Syria and the Sea People", Michael C. Astour, Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 92, No. 3, (Jul. - Sep., 1972), pp. 447-459 writing about someone who identified the Dardanians with the Trojans: "Which is, incidentally, not so: the Iliad carefully distinguishes the Dardanians from the Trojans, not only in the list of Trojan allies (11:816-823) but also in the frequently repeated formula keklyte meu, Tr6es kai Dardanoi ed' epikuroi (e.g., III:456)

    2. ^ Hoddinott, Ralph F., The Thracians, Thomas & Hudson Inc., 1981. Pgs.35-38

    3. ^ Macurdy, Grace Harriet, The Wanderings of Dardanus and the Dardani, Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association, Vol. 46 (1915), pp. 119-128

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardan

    Dardania (Anatolia)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    (Redirected from Dardania (Asia minor))

    Dardania in Greek mythology is the name of a city founded on Mount Ida
    by Dardanus from which also the region and the people took their name.
    It lay on the Hellespont,
    and is the source of the strait's modern name, the Dardanelles.

    From Dardanus' grandson Tros the people gained
    the additional name of Trojans and the region gained
    the additional name Troad. Tros' son Ilus
    subsequently founded a further city called Ilion (in Latin Ilium)
    down on the plain,
    the city now more commonly called Troy, and the kingdom was split between Ilium and Dardania.

    Dardania has also been defined as "a district of the Troad, lying along the Hellespont, southwest of Abydos, and adjacent to the territory of Ilium. Its people (Dardani) appear in the Trojan War under Aeneas, in close alliance with the Trojans, with whose name their own is often interchanged, especially by the Roman poets."[1]

    [edit] Footnotes

    1. ^ Harry Thurston Peck, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquity, 1898.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardania_(Asia_minor)

    Dardanus

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search

    For other uses, see Dardanus (disambiguation).

    In Greek mythology, Dardanus (Greek: Δάρδανος, English translation: "burned up",
    from the verb δαρδάπτω (dardapto) to wear, to slay, to burn up)
    [1] was a son of Zeus and Electra, daughter of Atlas,
    and founder of the city of Dardania on Mount Ida in the Troad.

    Dionysius of Halicarnassus (1.61–62) states that Dardanus' original home
    was in Arcadia where Dardanus and his elder brother Iasus
    (elsewhere more commonly called Iasion) reigned as kings following Atlas.

    Dardanus married Chryse daughter of Pallas by whom he fathered two sons:
    Idaeus and Dymas.

    When a great flood occurred, the survivors,
    who were living on mountains that had now become islands,
    split into two groups:
    one group remained and took Deimas as king while the other sailed away,
    eventually settling in the island of Samothrace.

    There Iasus (Iasion) was slain by Zeus for lying with Demeter.

    Dardanus and his people found the land poor and so most of them set sail for Asia.

    However another account by Virgil in his Aeneid (3.163f),
    has Aeneas in a dream learn from his ancestral Penates
    that "Dardanus and Father Iasius" and the Penates themselves
    originally came from Hesperia which was afterward renamed as Italy.

    This tradition holds that Dardanus was a Tyrrhenian prince,
    and that his mother Electra was married to Corythus, king of Tarquinia
    (Aeneid 7.195-242; 8. 596 ss. ; 9. 10; Servio, ad Vergilium, Aeneidos, 9.10).

    Other accounts make no mention of Arcadia or Hesperia,
    though they sometimes mention a flood and speak of Dardanus sailing
    on a hide-raft (as part of the flood story?)
    from Samothrace to the Troad near Abydos.

    All accounts agree that Dardanus came to the Troad from Samothrace
    and was there welcomed by King Teucer and that Dardanus married Batea
    the daughter of Teucer.

    (Dionysius mentions that Dardanus' first wife Chryse had died.)

    Dardanus received land on Mount Ida from his father-in-law.

    There Dardanus founded the city of Dardania.

    Dardanus' children by Batea were Ilus, Erichthonius and Idaea.

    According to Dionysius of Halicarnassus (1.50.3),
    Dardanus also had a son named Zacynthus by Bataea
    and this Zacynthus was the first settler on the island afterwards called Zacynthus.

    Dionysius also says (1.61.4) that Dardanus's son Idaeus gave his name
    to the Idaean mountains, that is Mount Ida,
    where Idaeus built a temple to the Mother of the Gods (that is to Cybele)
    and instituted mysteries and ceremonies still observed in Phrygia
    in Dionysius's time.

    There are operas on the subject of Dardanus by Jean-Philippe Rameau (1739), Carl Stamitz (1770) and Antonio Sacchini (1784).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardanus

    --------------------

    Name: Dardanus OF DARDANIA

    Prefix: King

    Given Name: Dardanus

    Surname: of Dardania

    Sex: M 1

    Father: Cambo Blascon (Jupiter II) OF THE JANIGENAE

    Mother: Tamar

    Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

    Married:

    Children

    Erichtonius OF DARDANIA

    Sources:

    Abbrev: Stevens (1998) Dardanus

    Title: The Line of Dardanus. In Descent from Adam.

    Author: Stevens, Luke

    Publication: Webpage: <http://www/geocities.com/Athens/Aegean/2444/Dardanus.htm>12/4/1998.

    --------------------

    in some sources this Dardanus looks like same person

    http://www.geni.com/profile/index/6000000006375582740

    --------------------

    Dardanus founded a city in the region that later was called the Troad,
    and lived there with his family until the death of his father-in-law,
    upon which he became king of the whole land and called it Dardania after himself.

    According to some, Batia was Dardanus's second wife,
    whom he married after the death of his first wife Chryse.

    His sons by her were Idaeus and Deimas.

    The latter stayed in Arcadia , whence they come
    (as it is said that Atlas was king of Arcadia ),
    but Idaeus emigrated with Dardanus, first to Samothrace,
    and later to Phrygia , where Mount Ida was called after him

    http://homepage.mac.com/cparada/GML/Troy.html

    --------------------

    http://www.ucg.org/brp/materials/throne/appendices/ap3.html

    Biblical basis for Darda

    Persistent secular legends from Greece and Rome identify Dara as Dardanus,
    founder of ancient Troy.[1]
    At least one translation of the Antiquities of Flavius Josephus,
    in mentioning King Solomon as being wiser than two men named Calcol
    and Dara (Darda), gives Dara's name as "Dardanos."
    So perhaps Dara and Dardanus were regarded as the same man during the first century AD.[2]

    As a further complication, the Greek poet Homer says
    that Dardanus was a son (or descendant) of Zeus, the chief of the Greek gods.[3],

    The Roman and Greek legends say that Zeus (called Jupiter in Latin)
    was a son of Saturn who was also called Kronus.

    Writing of the Greek gods, Sanchuniathon, a Phoenician historian,
    says that "Kronus, whom the Phoenicians called Israel, had a son Jehud."[4]

    From the above, some would cite Homer and Sanchuniathon as testifying
    that Dardanus (who founded the Trojan kingdom)
    was a descendant of Jehud (Judah) whose father was Israel.

    However, this deduction ignores the repeated custom that each Greek city
    followed as the cult of Zeus spread to it:
    they would identify their own municipal god-founder as Zeus
    and thus subsume their municipal cult into the cult of Zeus.
    Therefore no identification of Zeus with Judah could possibly be conclusive.
    In any event the Bible gives no direct evidence that the Zarhites,
    or any branches of that clan, abandoned the forty-year march
    of the Israelites and traveled to the Aegean Sea or the Black Sea
    (called the Euxine or Friendly Sea in those days) to found their own kingdoms.

    That at least some Hebrew manuscripts, including the Westminster Leningrad Codex, lack 1_Kings 4:20-34 , including the key verse that spells the name of Dara as "Darda", might or might not be significant. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardanus --------------------
    The Trojans were descendants of Atlas. Dardanus 1, son of Electra 3,
    daughter of Atlas, is at the beginning of the house of Troy,
    for Dardanus 1 is father of Erichthonius 1, father of Tros 1
    (after whom the Trojans are called),
    father of Ilus 2 (founder of Ilium, that is, Troy),
    father of Laomedon 1, father of Priam 1, who was king when the city was destroyed.
    -------------------- Poss. Jullus i Roms 6-oldefar.

    Kone / partner: Batea af TEUCRI

    Mulige Børn: (NN) ... (NN) , Coribus , Erichthonius (King) af Acadia Alternative Fædre Mulige Børn: Dardanus (King) i DARDANIA & Skytien , dardan (Darius) i Norse genealogier

    --

    Hans (evt.) 2 (+)-oldebørn: Cynane af MAKEDONIEN , ILE'er (Ilyus) (King) i TROY , Assaracus (Ascaoracus) den DARDANIAN , Themiste af TROY , Laomedan (King) i TROY , Telecleia af Thrakien ; ( NN) ... (NN) , Capys (capis Capps) den DARDANIAN

    --

    Fra http://fabpedigree.com/s064/f486192.htm

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Tue Apr 16, 2013 8:44 pm

    Nasor of The Septimii
    is your 59th great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Nasor-of-The-Septimii/6000000003645870209

    Nasor of The Septimii is your 59th great grandfather.

    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You




    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother



    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father



    JAMES HANDY
    his father



    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother



    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father



    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    John Ruthven
    his father



    George Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    Sir William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven, 2nd Lord of Ruthven
    his father



    Catherine Gray of Buttergask - Stewart - Ruthven
    his mother



    Elisabeth Stewart, Countess of Argyll
    her mother



    John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl
    her father



    Joan Beaufort, Queen consort of Scots
    his mother



    Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Somerset
    her mother



    Alice FitzAlan, Countess of Kent
    her mother



    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel
    her father



    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel
    his father



    Alisona di Saluzzo
    his mother



    Leugia Luisa de Ceva di saluzzo
    her mother



    Giorgio di Ceva, Marquis di Ceva
    her father



    Daughter DeSaluzzo
    his mother



    Manfredo di Saluzzo, II
    her father



    Manfredo I, marquis di Saluzzo
    his father



    Bonifacio de Saluzzo Marchese del Vasto. Marchese della Liguria Occidentale.
    his father



    Oddone 'Teuto' del Vasto, marchese di Savona
    his father



    Adelasia
    his mother



    Alberto-Azzo I d'Este
    her father



    Hugues I d'Este
    his father



    Sigebert d'Este
    his father



    Alberto Azzon I d'Este
    his father



    Guido, marchese della Toscana
    his father



    Adalbert II, Margrave of Tuscany
    his father



    Adalbertus I, marchio Tuscus
    his father



    Bonifacius II, conte di Lucca
    his father



    Bonifacius I, marchio Tuscus
    his father



    N.N., Wife of Bonifacio I
    his mother



    Henryk książę z Tervis
    her father



    Ernest
    his father



    Heribert
    his father



    Gundelhard
    his father



    Antonia
    his mother



    Italica
    her mother



    Johannes
    her father



    Theodora
    his mother



    Theodora, Eastern Roman Empress
    her mother



    Acacius "the Bear-keeper"
    her father



    Diogenes
    his father



    Eusebius
    his father



    Flavianus
    his father



    Eusebius
    his father



    Odenathus
    his father



    Wahballtes of Palmyra
    his father



    Septimius Odenathus, King of Palmyra
    his father



    Hairian
    his father



    Wahballath
    his father



    Nasor of The Septimii
    his father

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Wed Apr 17, 2013 12:08 am

    FEMALE APOSTOLIC SUCCESSION
    by Kimberleyann Montgomery (Notes)
    on Tuesday, January 3, 2012 at 5:01pm


    Were Jesus & Mary Magdalene on the holy Isle of Iona?

    The Johannine Celtic Church ;

    The Celtic Church & the monastic tradition of the

    Middle East

    E-zine archive


    *WAS THERE A FEMALE APOSTOLIC SUCCESSION? **

    by Barry Dunford*


    A 19th century French researcher, Édouard Schuré, in his work

    The Great Initiates: A Study of the Secret History of Religions,

    first published

    in 1889, writes: "Women have a special place among Jesus followers.

    Christ is the restorer and liberator of women,

    whatever Saint Paul and the Church Fathers may have said.

    Christ elevates her by

    restoring her mission of love and divination. The woman initiate

    represents the soul in mankind.

    that is, the power of Intuition, the loving and seeing faculty.

    The turbulent Mary Magdalene became his most

    ardent disciple.

    It was she, according to Saint John, who first saw the

    divine teacher, the spiritual Christ, risen from his tomb.

    Legend has insisted in seeing in this ardent and believing woman Jesus' greatest

    worshipper, the initiate of the heart, and legend is not mistaken,

    for her story represents the entire regeneration of woman as desired by the Christ."

    The spiritual role of women was also recognised in the pre-Christian

    Druid tradition.

    According to the Welsh bard, Edward Jones:

    "Beside the Druids, the Britons had Druidesses, who assisted in the offices of

    religion, and shared in the honours and emoluments of the priesthood.

    The Druidesses of Gaul and Britain are said to have been divided into

    three ranks, or classes." (The Bardic Museum of Primitive British

    Literature, 1802).

    The Rev. Richard Smiddy also writes: "It appears

    that females were, at one time, admitted to the order or fraternity of

    the Druids, and that they were appointed to fill certain offices in

    connection with the oracles or suil-bheil.

    Hence, the name of sibyl or sibylla, of the Latins.

    A female of this class was called a bean-draoi,

    that is, 'a woman Druid'; and by the name was meant a priestess,

    prophetess, or enchantress.

    We have already seen that the suil-beal,

    that is, the sibyl, or oracle, was an institution of the Druids.

    It is stated that some of these oracles, or sibyls, uttered matters in

    connection with the life of the future Redeemer." (An Essay on the

    Druids, the Ancient Churches and the Round Towers of Ireland, 1871).

    Interestingly, Dr. John A. Goodchild notes: "I have been working

    hard at various old puzzles relating to the Mother-Church at Glaston.

    I am pretty clear of this, that from the establishment of that Church

    before the middle of the 1st century, a woman, always a Princess of the

    Royal Blood, was its Supreme Head and Nursing Mother, until she laid

    down her authority about the middle of the 6th century at an Irish

    Church Congress held under the presidency of Comgal of Bangor."

    (Ref.
    The Avalonians/ by Patrick Benham, 1993)



    The canonical gospels of the New Testament record the presence of a

    number of women disciples around Jesus, especially Mary Magdalene.

    Could there have been a female apostolic succession which ostensibly has gone unrecorded

    in the official history books?

    In the Christian Gnostic texts Mary Magdalene is referred to as

    "the apostle to the apostles" and in France (ancient Celtic Gaul) she is

    known as the "apostle of Provence".

    There is also a tradition of another

    female disciple of Jesus called Lourda who founded Lourdes in France.

    Looking at the possible role of female Christian initiates within the

    Church of Christ, in some instances they may have been ordained under

    the title of Deaconess. Moreover, the Celtic female saints were often

    associated with holy wells and springs which could suggest a continuity

    with the pre-Christian Annat tradition relating to the mother Goddess

    Anaitis who may have been associated with lunar worship.

    In the ancient Pagan era the moon held priority to the sun in

    celtic devotion.

    In fact, the celtic calendar is lunar based.

    Interestingly, the gaelic celts saw the moon as masculine and the sun as

    feminine.

    *Examples of female Celtic Saints: *

    St. Etheldreda, a 7th century British saint, daughter of a British King.

    Married a King of Northumbria.

    Later became an Abbess founding a

    monastery at Ely in East Anglia on the site of the present cathedral.



    St. Winifred (Gwenfrewi in welsh meaning radiant freda).

    Gwen can mean white, shining or holy.

    She was a niece of St. Beuno (6th century) who

    claimed descent from a relative of the Holy Family of Jesus.

    She was renowned for her healing well at Holywell in North Wales.

    On the seal of the cathedral chapter of St. Asaph, in Wales,

    she appears as an Abbess

    bearing a crozier which was a symbol of leadership and authority.



    St. Ita (Ytha).

    Born in 480 A. D of noble descent in County Waterford,

    Ireland.

    She founded a monastic settlement at Killeedy (Cill Ide).

    She is said to have died in 570 A. D and was known as

    "the foster mother of the saints of Ireland",

    because she was a mother figure to several of

    Ireland's early saints, including St. Brendan.

    Her symbol was a cross

    with a heart at the centre of a small labyrinth.



    St. Hilda (614-680 A. D).

    She was the niece of King Edwin of Northumbria.

    She studied the traditions of Celtic monasticism which St. Aiden brought from Iona.

    St. Aiden later appointed St. Hilda as an

    Abbess and she founded a monastery at Whitby in north Yorkshire.

    Archeological evidence shows that her monastery was in the celtic style

    with its members living in small houses for two or three people.

    She gained such a reputation for wisdom that kings and princes sought her advice.



    St. Bega. A 7th century saint who came from County Down in Ireland to

    north Britain and apparently founded a small female religious community

    inspired by St. Aiden. Place names link St. Bega with Cumbria, northern

    England, and the Scottish borders.

    She also associated with St. Hilda

    and St. Etheldreda.



    St. Brigid or Brigit (453-523 A. D) who founded a monastery for both

    monks and nuns at Kildare in Ireland.

    She is said to be buried at

    Downpatrick together with St. Patrick and St. Columba, which clearly

    shows that St. Brigid was highly venerated in the early Celtic Church.

    It has been suggested that Kildare may have been the site of an earlier

    Druid seat of learning.



    St. Winifred St. Ita St. Bridget

    *St. Winifred *



    *St. Ita *



    *St. Bridget *



    Like their male counterparts, all of these female saints were of royal and noble descent.

    Could they have been initiates of a Johannine Celtic Church?

    It may be of interest to note that traditionally St. John,

    together with the Virgin Mary and Mary Magdalene, was at Ephesus in Anatolia, Asia Minor,

    where there was a major mystery temple dedicated to Artemis, a moon goddess,

    whom the Greeks also called Diana.

    This Temple was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.

    The Johannine mystery tradition may have incorporated an initiatic tradition which

    could have included women as well as men.



    *Women Deacons in the early Christian Church*



    In her Studies in Early Mysticism in the Near and Middle East (1931),

    Margaret Smith writes:

    "Asceticism and the monastic life found almost as many adherents among the women

    of the early Christian Church as among the men.

    Women held a high position in the early Christian Church;

    we note that St. Paul salutes fifteen women alongside of eighteen men.

    Women exercised the prophetic office,

    and Priscilla, whose name is twice mentioned before that of her husband by St. Paul,

    as if she held a more prominent position in the Church, was evidently a missionary and teacher of distinction, and it has been suggested, with some reason, that she was the writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews.

    The order of deaconesses

    (ministræ) is mentioned by Pliny, and there appears to have been an order of regular female ascetics,

    who formed an important part of the organisation of the Church in the first three centuries,

    and had their names enrolled on the list of church officials.

    The Acts of Paul and Thekla, written about A. D. 179, which appears to contain some genuine

    information about St. Paul, gives a prominent role to women, as prophetesses,

    and above all to the 'apostle' Thekla of Iconium, who is said to have baptised,

    and to have enlightened many with the word of God.

    Origen had a number of women pupils.

    Up to the end of the second century or later, women appear to have been prominent in the Christian

    Church as deaconesses, prophetesses, teachers and missionaries.

    Women seem, indeed, to have been in the majority, at least among the upper classes,

    in the early Christian Church, and in the persecution of Licinius, about A. D. 322,

    special prohibitions were directed against women, as if the emperor realised that the strength

    of Christianity lay in its women members."



    Regarding the female 'apostle' Thecla, in her work "The Lost Apostle" (2006)

    Rena Pederson writes: "There are multiple examples of art honoring Thecla in Egypt.

    In Rome, scholars found a sarcophagus with a relief showing Paul and Thecla traveling together in a boat.

    A catacomb of St. Thecla can be found on the Via Ostiensis, not far from the burial

    place of St. Paul, and is mentioned in the seventh-century itineraries

    to the graves of the Roman martyrs.

    Santa Thecla also is the patron saint of Tarragona, Spain,

    and there are Iberian wall designs from the first century showing Paul preaching to Thecla.

    There appear to have been attempts to obscure Thecla's role in later years.

    One of the foremost Jesus scholars in the United States, John Dominic Crossan, of

    DePaul University, and Jonathan L. Reed, a leading authority on first-century Palestinian archaeology,

    recently brought to light an attempt to suppress the Thecla story.

    In their book In Search of Paul, Crossan and Reed tell of a cave that was discovered around 1906,

    high above the ruins of Ephesus.

    Just to the right of the entrance are two sixth-century images of St. Thecla and St. Paul.

    Both are the same height, an iconographic sign that they are of equal importance.

    Both have their right hands raised in a blessing gesture, again an

    iconographic sign that they are of equal authority.

    While the image of Paul was left untouched over the centuries, someone later scratched out

    the eyes and upraised fingers of the Thecla figure, erasing her blessing gesture.

    If both figures had been disfigured, Crossan and Reed point out,

    it could be chalked up as a random act of vandalism.

    But it was only the Thecla figure that was defaced.

    Paul remains as an authority figure.

    The woman is blinded and silenced.

    Crossan and Reed observe that

    'even the cave's present name, 'St. Paul's Grotto,' continues the

    negation of female-male equality once depicted on the walls'."

    During the early centuries A. D. the Celtic Church in the west tended to

    follow the traditional mode of worship of the Eastern Church (rather than the Roman Church).

    We find that St. Paul's letters mention a number

    of Christian women in the ministry by name and this was clearly the case

    with the Celtic Christian Church in Britain. St. Clement of Alexandria (150-215)

    testifies to women deacons, ascribing tasks to them that would

    still be entrusted to ordain women deacons centuries later:

    "The apostles, giving themselves without respite to the work of evangelism as

    befitted their ministry, took with them women, not as wives but as sisters,

    so that they might serve as their co-ministers, serving women living at home:

    by their agency the teaching of the Lord reached the

    women's quarters without arousing suspicion.

    We are also aware of all the things Paul prescribed on the subject of women deacons in one of the

    two letters to Timothy."


    In the 2nd and 3rd centuries women continued to be involved in the apostolate.

    The Didascalia Apostolorum (c. 250 A. D), a pastoral handbook,

    urges Bishops to ordain men and women deacons.

    The Council of Nicea (325 A. D) witnessed to the existence of women deacons.

    The Greek Fathers of the 3rd, 4th and 5th centuries mention women deacons.

    The Apostolic Constitutions (380 A. D), another collection of pastoral directives,

    repeated the instructions on women deacons already found in the Didascalia.

    It also preserved the oldest known ordination rite for women deacons.


    A 4th century tombstone in Jerusalem commemorates a deacon called Sophia.

    The Greek text reads "Here lies the servant and bride of Christ,

    Sophia, the (woman) deacon."

    In Cicilia, in modern Turkey, five tombs honouring the memory of women deacons have been found.

    In Jerusalem, four women deacons are recorded on tombstones

    and another four elsewhere in Palestine.

    The ancient calendar of saints for the Greek-Byzantine part of the church fixed feast days for 26 women deacons.

    They provide evidence for the impact women deacons had upon their local church communities.

    In Gaul (ancient France) we find women deacons such as

    St. Radegunde and St. Genevieve, the patron saint of Paris.

    Some women deacons were nuns at the same time, often superiors of convents

    so that they could attend to the spiritual needs of their sisters.

    This may explain how in the West traces of the diaconate ordination were retained in the installation

    of prioresses and abbesses of some orders of women.

    The laws of Justinian more than once mention the men and women under the heading "men and women deacons".

    The Didascalia of the apostles (c. 250 A. D) was a pastoral handbook for bishops,

    presented as instructions left by the apostles.

    Originally composed in Greek it was translated into Syriac, Arabic and Latin.

    (Interestingly, in the Latin which is the only version available for

    this text, the term 'Diaconissa' appears.)

    This apostolic pastoral handbook states:

    "We assert that the ministry of a woman deacon is

    especially required and urgent. For our Lord and Saviour was himself

    served by women deacons, such as Mary Magdalene, Mary, the daughter of James and mother of Joseph,

    and the mother of the sons of Zebedee, along with still other women."

    The original Greek word for deacon meant "servant" and it was used as a term for both men and women.

    In Christian communities it indicated a special ministry to which persons were assigned by ordination.

    As an interesting aside, the Rev. William Lee Ker, in his book Mother Lodge Kilwinning:

    the Ancient Lodge of Scotland, published in 1896,

    says that: "The Grand Deacons of Mother Kilwinning from 1642 to 1732

    were to all intents and purposes the Grand Masters."

    We know that Kilwinning was at one time the site of a Culdee Community.

    Could the use of the term Deacon in this instance imply a possible continuity

    from the Culdee Christian Order to Scottish

    Freemasonry?

    Women in Holy Orders

    *St. Mary mosaic, San Venanzio*



    Finally, there is an interesting mosaic in the oratory of San Venanzio

    in Rome dated 642 A.D. which was made under Popes John IV and Theodorus,

    both Greeks by birth.

    The image shows the Virgin Mary, praying with her hands outstretched,

    apparently with two haloed female companions. Her main dress is a tunic.

    Her veil is part of the mantle. It covers her head and her upper body and flows down all the way

    to just above her ankles, revealing a tunic in front. Coming down from underneath her veil,

    but over the tunic, we can see a bishop's pallium marked with a cross.

    Women deacons wore their stole in the same way, but in their case

    two extremities would hang in front.

    (Ref. No Women in Holy Order - The Women Deacons of the Early Church by John Wijngaards, 2002)



    Could there have been a female apostolic succession from the Virgin Mary

    just as there was a male apostolic succession ordained by her son Jesus?


    Could this perhaps have been written out of the ostensible historical

    records by male scribes acting under the instruction and supervision of

    a patriarchally dominated church?

    With the information to hand at present we can but speculate and wonder.

    We should also remember that a number of celtic royal saints, both male and female,

    claimed genealogical descent from the family of the Mother of Christ.

    This might also reinforce the notion of a possible hereditary right of succession.

    Hereditary succession was central to the Culdee communities

    and fifteen unbroken generations have been listed at Armagh,

    the ecclesiastical primacy of the Celtic church in Ireland.

    It is also possible that a female apostolic succession could have been founded on a family and

    hereditary basis from women who were directly related to the Holy Family of Christ.


    *Extracted from ~ Vision of Albion - The Key to the Holy Grail (2008) *



    © Copyright 2010 Barry Dunford. All rights reserved.


    Barry Dunford is the author of The Holy Land of Scotland: Jesus in Scotland and the Gospel of the Grail

    (revised and expanded edition 2002) and Vision of Albion. The Key to the Holy Grail.

    Jesus, Mary Magdalene and the Christ Family in the Holy Land of Britain (December 2008)



    THEeXchanger

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    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Wed Apr 17, 2013 1:10 am

    Senebhanef, Vizier of Egypt is your 133rd great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Senebhanef-Vizier-of-Egypt/6000000018565101278?through=6000000018563899728

    Senebhanef, Vizier of Egypt
    Immediate Family:

    Husband of Princess Sebekhotep of Egypt
    Father of Sekhemre-sementawi Djehuti, King of Egypt

    Senebhanef, Vizier of Egypt is your 133rd great grandfather.

    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You




    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother



    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father



    JAMES HANDY
    his father



    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother



    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father



    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    John Ruthven
    his father



    George Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    Sir William Ruthven
    his father



    Janet Ruthven (Halyburton), 6th Lady Dirletoun
    his mother



    Patrick Halyburton, 5th/6th Lord Dirletoun
    her father



    George Halyburton, 3rd/4th Lord Dirletoun
    his father



    Sir John Halyburton
    his father



    Marjorie Stewart Haliburton, Countess of Atholl
    his mother



    Joanna Moray, Lady of Drumersgard
    her mother



    Joan de Menteith
    her mother



    Helena of Mar
    her mother



    Gartnait MacDomhnaill, 7th Earl of Mar
    her father



    Elen ferch Llywelyn, Countess
    his mother



    Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of Wales
    her father



    Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain
    his father



    Gwladys verch Llywarch
    his mother



    Dyddgu verch Iorwerth
    her mother



    Iorwerth ap Cadwgon
    her father



    Elen verch Brochwel
    his mother



    Brochwel ab Aeddan, Lord of Powys
    her father



    Aeddan ap Cyngen
    his father



    Cyngen ap Cadell
    his father



    Cadell ap Brochwel
    his father



    Brochwel ap Elisedd
    his father



    Elisedd ap Gwylog
    his father



    Sanan ferch Nowy
    his mother



    Nowy ap Arthwyr
    her father



    Arthwyr ap Pedr
    his father



    Pedr ap Cyngar
    his father



    Cyngar ap Gwerthefyr
    his father



    Gwerthefyr ap Aergul lawhir
    his father



    Aircol ap Triffyn, King Of Demetia
    his father



    Triffyn mac Aed Brosc, Brenin Dyfed
    his father



    Aed Brosc mac Corath, King
    his father



    Corach ap Eochaid Allmuir
    his father



    Eochaid Allmuir mac Art Corp
    his father



    Art Corp mac Cairbre Rigron
    his father



    Cairpre Rigronn mac Fiachadh
    his father



    Fiachadh mac Fedelmid
    his father



    Fedlimid Rechtmar, 108th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Túathal Teachtmhar, 106th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Fiacha Finnfolaidh mac Feredach, Ard rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Feradach Finnfechtnach mac Crimhthann, Ard rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Criomhthann Niadh Nár mac Lughaidh, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg mac Findemna, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Bres, Nár and Lothar Findemna mac Echdach
    his father



    Eochaidh Feidlioch mac Fionn, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Finn mac Fionlogha, King in Ireland
    his father



    Fionnlogh O'Henna, King in Ireland
    his father



    Roignein Ruadh Mac Esamon O'Henna, King of Ireland
    his father



    Eassamhuin Eamhna mac Enna
    his father



    Enna Aignech, Ard Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Aengus Tuirbheach, 81st High King of Ireland
    his father



    Eochaid Ailtleathan, 79th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Ailill Cas-Fiacalaig, 77th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Condla Cáem, 76th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Irero Gleo Fáthach, 74th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Meilge Molbhthach, 71st High King of Ireland
    his father



    Cobhthach Cóel Breg, High King of Ireland
    his father



    Úgaine Mór mac Echach, 66th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Eochaid Buaidhaig mac Duach
    his father



    Duach II mac Fiachach
    his father



    Fiachadh mac Muiredach
    his father



    Muireadhach I Balgrach mac Simon
    his father



    Simon mac Aedham, King of Ireland
    his father



    Aedham/Aodhan Glas, King of Ireland
    his father



    Nuadhat Finn Fail mac Giallchaidh
    his father



    Giallchaidh mac Olioll, 37th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Oilioll Olchaoin mac Siorna, King of Ireland
    his father



    Siorna Saoghalach mac Dain, Ard Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Deman mac Rotheachta, Prince of Ireland
    his father



    Rothechtaid MacMaen
    his father



    Maoin I Oilbhuagach MacAongus
    his father



    Aonghus Olmucadha The Big Headed One Mac Fiacha, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Fiacha Labhrainne MacSimorgoill
    his father



    Simorgoill mac Eanbotha, High King of Ireland
    his father



    Eanbrotha MacTighearnmas King of Ireland
    his father



    Tighearnmhas Masius mac Follach, High King of Ireland
    his father



    Follach Folian mac Eithrial
    his father



    Eithriall, 11th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Irial Faidh mac Eremoin, 10th Ard Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Érimón mac Míl Espáine, 2nd High King of Ireland
    his father



    Scota, Queen of the Gadelians
    his mother



    Wehimbre Necho, King of Egypt
    her father



    Wahibre Psamtek I, King of Egypt
    his father



    Menkheperre Necho I of Sais and Memphis
    his father



    Prince Ibre Nakauba
    his father



    Wahkare Bekenranef of Sais, King of Egypt (d. 712 BC)
    his father



    Shepsesre Tefnakhte I of Sais, King of Egypt
    his father



    Osorkon, Great Chief of Ma
    his father



    Usermare Setepenre Pimay, King of Egypt (d. 773 BC)
    his father



    Djedbastesankh of Memphis
    his mother



    Takelot, High Priest of Ptah at Memphis
    her father



    Shoshenk, High Priest of Ptah at Memphis
    his father



    Princess Karoma
    his mother



    Hedjkheperre Setepenamun Harsiese King of Egypt
    her father



    Heqakheperre Setepenre Shoshenk, King of Egypt
    his father



    Princess Maatkare of Egypt
    his mother



    Pinudjem II Titkheperre, High Priest of Egypt
    her father



    Princess Istemkheb of Egypt
    his mother



    Akheperre Psibkha’emne, King of Egypt
    her father



    Henuttawy of Egypt
    his mother



    Khaemwaset Menmare Ramses XI, King of Egypt (d. 1070 BC)
    her father



    Amenhirkhopsef Khepermarc Ramses X, King of Egypt (d. 1098 BC)
    his father



    Khaemwaset Neferkare Ramses IX, King of Egypt (d. 1108 BC)
    his father



    Sethirkhopsef Usirmare Ramses, King of Egypt (d. 1126 BC)
    his father



    Usimare Meryamun Ramses III, King of Egypt
    his father



    Usirkha’ure Meryamun Seknakht, King of Egypt
    his father



    Usirmare Setepenre Ramses II, of Egypt (1314-1224 BC)
    his father



    Sety Meryenptah, King of Egypt
    his father



    Queen Sitre of Egypt
    his mother



    Nebmare Amenhotep III, Egypt
    her father



    Menkheprure Thutmose (Djehutymes) IV, King of Egypt
    his father



    Aakheperure Amenhotep II, King of Egypt (d. 1400 BC)
    his father



    Menkheperre Thutmose III, of Egypt
    his father



    Akheperenre Thutmose II, King of Egypt
    his father



    Akheperkare Tuthmosis I, King of Egypt
    his father



    Ahmes-Sapair, Prince of Egypt
    his father



    Seqenenre Tao II “the Brave”, King of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhenre-wahkhau Rahotep, King of Egypt
    his father



    Nubkheperre Inyotef VII (V), of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhemre-shedtawi Sebekemsaf I, King of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhemre-se’ankhtawi Neferhotep III, King of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhemre-sementawi Djehuti, King of Egypt
    his father



    Senebhanef, Vizier of Egypt
    his father
    Senebhanef, Vizier of Egypt is your 133rd great grandfather.

    ********************************************************************

    Princess Sebekhotep of Egypt is your 133rd great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Princess-Sebekhotep-of-Egypt/6000000018565152260?through=6000000018565101278


    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Wed Apr 17, 2013 1:34 am

    THE FAMILY of Princess Sebekhotep of Egypt
    who is the 133rd great grandmother of Susan Lynne Schwenger aka The eXchanger

    Khaneferre Sebekhotep IV, King of Egypt is your 134th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Khaneferre-Sebekhotep-IV-King-of-Egypt/6000000018565172529?through=6000000018565152260

    Tjani is your 134th great grandmother.

    Ha-ankhef is your 135th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Ha-ankhef/6000000018561860809?through=6000000018565172529

    Princess Kemi is your 135th great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Princess-Kemi/6000000018564461417?through=6000000018561860809

    Daughter of Amenemhat III Nemare, King of Egypt (1900 BC) Pyramid builder
    Wife of Ha-ankhef
    Mother of Khaneferre Sebekhotep IV, King of Egypt
    http://www.geni.com/people/Princess-Kemi/6000000018564461417?through=6000000018561860809

    Princess Kemi is your 135th great grandmother.

    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You




    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother



    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father



    JAMES HANDY
    his father



    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother



    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father



    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    John Ruthven
    his father



    George Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    Sir William Ruthven
    his father



    Janet Ruthven (Halyburton), 6th Lady Dirletoun
    his mother



    Patrick Halyburton, 5th/6th Lord Dirletoun
    her father



    George Halyburton, 3rd/4th Lord Dirletoun
    his father



    Sir John Halyburton
    his father



    Marjorie Stewart Haliburton, Countess of Atholl
    his mother



    Joanna Moray, Lady of Drumersgard
    her mother



    Joan de Menteith
    her mother



    Helena of Mar
    her mother



    Gartnait MacDomhnaill, 7th Earl of Mar
    her father



    Elen ferch Llywelyn, Countess
    his mother



    Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of Wales
    her father



    Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain
    his father



    Gwladys verch Llywarch
    his mother



    Dyddgu verch Iorwerth
    her mother



    Iorwerth ap Cadwgon
    her father



    Elen verch Brochwel
    his mother



    Brochwel ab Aeddan, Lord of Powys
    her father



    Aeddan ap Cyngen
    his father



    Cyngen ap Cadell
    his father



    Cadell ap Brochwel
    his father



    Brochwel ap Elisedd
    his father



    Elisedd ap Gwylog
    his father



    Sanan ferch Nowy
    his mother



    Nowy ap Arthwyr
    her father



    Arthwyr ap Pedr
    his father



    Pedr ap Cyngar
    his father



    Cyngar ap Gwerthefyr
    his father



    Gwerthefyr ap Aergul lawhir
    his father



    Aircol ap Triffyn, King Of Demetia
    his father



    Triffyn mac Aed Brosc, Brenin Dyfed
    his father



    Aed Brosc mac Corath, King
    his father



    Corach ap Eochaid Allmuir
    his father



    Eochaid Allmuir mac Art Corp
    his father



    Art Corp mac Cairbre Rigron
    his father



    Cairpre Rigronn mac Fiachadh
    his father



    Fiachadh mac Fedelmid
    his father



    Fedlimid Rechtmar, 108th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Túathal Teachtmhar, 106th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Fiacha Finnfolaidh mac Feredach, Ard rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Feradach Finnfechtnach mac Crimhthann, Ard rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Criomhthann Niadh Nár mac Lughaidh, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg mac Findemna, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Bres, Nár and Lothar Findemna mac Echdach
    his father



    Eochaidh Feidlioch mac Fionn, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Finn mac Fionlogha, King in Ireland
    his father



    Fionnlogh O'Henna, King in Ireland
    his father



    Roignein Ruadh Mac Esamon O'Henna, King of Ireland
    his father



    Eassamhuin Eamhna mac Enna
    his father



    Enna Aignech, Ard Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Aengus Tuirbheach, 81st High King of Ireland
    his father



    Eochaid Ailtleathan, 79th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Ailill Cas-Fiacalaig, 77th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Condla Cáem, 76th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Irero Gleo Fáthach, 74th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Meilge Molbhthach, 71st High King of Ireland
    his father



    Cobhthach Cóel Breg, High King of Ireland
    his father



    Úgaine Mór mac Echach, 66th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Eochaid Buaidhaig mac Duach
    his father



    Duach II mac Fiachach
    his father



    Fiachadh mac Muiredach
    his father



    Muireadhach I Balgrach mac Simon
    his father



    Simon mac Aedham, King of Ireland
    his father



    Aedham/Aodhan Glas, King of Ireland
    his father



    Nuadhat Finn Fail mac Giallchaidh
    his father



    Giallchaidh mac Olioll, 37th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Oilioll Olchaoin mac Siorna, King of Ireland
    his father



    Siorna Saoghalach mac Dain, Ard Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Deman mac Rotheachta, Prince of Ireland
    his father



    Rothechtaid MacMaen
    his father



    Maoin I Oilbhuagach MacAongus
    his father



    Aonghus Olmucadha The Big Headed One Mac Fiacha, Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Fiacha Labhrainne MacSimorgoill
    his father



    Simorgoill mac Eanbotha, High King of Ireland
    his father



    Eanbrotha MacTighearnmas King of Ireland
    his father



    Tighearnmhas Masius mac Follach, High King of Ireland
    his father



    Follach Folian mac Eithrial
    his father



    Eithriall, 11th High King of Ireland
    his father



    Irial Faidh mac Eremoin, 10th Ard Rí na h'Éireann
    his father



    Érimón mac Míl Espáine, 2nd High King of Ireland
    his father



    Scota, Queen of the Gadelians
    his mother



    Wehimbre Necho, King of Egypt
    her father



    Wahibre Psamtek I, King of Egypt
    his father



    Menkheperre Necho I of Sais and Memphis
    his father



    Prince Ibre Nakauba
    his father



    Wahkare Bekenranef of Sais, King of Egypt (d. 712 BC)
    his father



    Shepsesre Tefnakhte I of Sais, King of Egypt
    his father



    Osorkon, Great Chief of Ma
    his father



    Usermare Setepenre Pimay, King of Egypt (d. 773 BC)
    his father



    Djedbastesankh of Memphis
    his mother



    Takelot, High Priest of Ptah at Memphis
    her father



    Shoshenk, High Priest of Ptah at Memphis
    his father



    Princess Karoma
    his mother



    Hedjkheperre Setepenamun Harsiese King of Egypt
    her father



    Heqakheperre Setepenre Shoshenk, King of Egypt
    his father



    Princess Maatkare of Egypt
    his mother



    Pinudjem II Titkheperre, High Priest of Egypt
    her father



    Princess Istemkheb of Egypt
    his mother



    Akheperre Psibkha’emne, King of Egypt
    her father



    Henuttawy of Egypt
    his mother



    Khaemwaset Menmare Ramses XI, King of Egypt (d. 1070 BC)
    her father



    Amenhirkhopsef Khepermarc Ramses X, King of Egypt (d. 1098 BC)
    his father



    Khaemwaset Neferkare Ramses IX, King of Egypt (d. 1108 BC)
    his father



    Sethirkhopsef Usirmare Ramses, King of Egypt (d. 1126 BC)
    his father



    Usimare Meryamun Ramses III, King of Egypt
    his father



    Usirkha’ure Meryamun Seknakht, King of Egypt
    his father



    Usirmare Setepenre Ramses II, of Egypt (1314-1224 BC)
    his father



    Sety Meryenptah, King of Egypt
    his father



    Queen Sitre of Egypt
    his mother



    Nebmare Amenhotep III, Egypt
    her father



    Menkheprure Thutmose (Djehutymes) IV, King of Egypt
    his father



    Aakheperure Amenhotep II, King of Egypt (d. 1400 BC)
    his father



    Menkheperre Thutmose III, of Egypt
    his father



    Akheperenre Thutmose II, King of Egypt
    his father



    Akheperkare Tuthmosis I, King of Egypt
    his father



    Ahmes-Sapair, Prince of Egypt
    his father



    Seqenenre Tao II “the Brave”, King of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhenre-wahkhau Rahotep, King of Egypt
    his father



    Nubkheperre Inyotef VII (V), of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhemre-shedtawi Sebekemsaf I, King of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhemre-se’ankhtawi Neferhotep III, King of Egypt
    his father



    Sekhemre-sementawi Djehuti, King of Egypt
    his father



    Princess Sebekhotep of Egypt
    his mother



    Khaneferre Sebekhotep IV, King of Egypt
    her father



    Princess Kemi
    his mother
    Princess Kemi is your 135th great grandmother.

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Wed Apr 17, 2013 2:50 am

    EGYPTIAN PYRAMID BUILDERS
    - GREAT GRANDFATHER of Susan Lynne Schwenger

    Amenemhat III Nemare, King of Egypt (1900 BC) Pyramid builder is your 136th great grandfather.


    Son of Sesostris III Khakaure, King of Egypt and Sebekshedty-Neferu
    Father of Princess Kemi

    http://www.geni.com/people/Amenemhat-III-Nemare-King-of-Egypt-1900-BC-Pyramid-builder/6000000018564786353?through=6000000018564461417

    Sesostris III Khakaure, King of Egypt is your 137th great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Sesostris-III-Khakaure-King-of-Egypt/6000000018565099450?through=6000000018564786353

    Sebekshedty-Neferu is your 137th great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Sebekshedty-Neferu/6000000018564228585?through=6000000018565099450

    Sesostris III Khakaure, King of Egypt is your 137th great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Sesostris-III-Khakaure-King-of-Egypt/6000000018565099450?through=6000000018564228585

    Sesostris II Khakheperre, King of Egypt is your 138th great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Sesostris-II-Khakheperre-King-of-Egypt/6000000018565436165?through=6000000018565099450

    Nofret is your 138th great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Nofret/6000000018565126442?through=6000000018565436165

    Amenemhat II Nubkaure, King of Egypt is your 139th great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Amenemhat-II-Nubkaure-King-of-Egypt/6000000018564644358?through=6000000018565436165

    Keminnub is your 139th great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Keminnub/6000000018565086349?through=6000000018564644358

    (continue here: http://www.geni.com/people/Sensusret-I-Kheperkare-King-of-Egypt/6000000018565185173?through=6000000018564644358)

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Wed Apr 17, 2013 2:57 am

    POST to complete the egyptian lines

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:03 am

    THE WELSH HOLY BEINGS - AND, THE SAINTS


    St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog is your 35th great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/St-Brychan-Gododdin-Brenin-Brycheiniog/377661791800005806?through=4822569528910053382

    his blood children, are known as saint

    Arianwen verch Brychan, Saint
    his mother
    is your 34th great grandfather

    *************************************************************************************
    St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog
    This is the Master Profile for St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog.
    Curator Note from Catherine (Erin) Spiceland (1/17/2011):

    It is said that he had 24 sons and 24 daughters. Many historians believe that children were falsely attributed to him in an attempt to "connect" with his family because it is one of the "Holy Families" of Briton.

    St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog is your 35th great grandfather.

    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You




    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother



    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father



    JAMES HANDY
    his father



    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother



    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father



    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    John Ruthven
    his father



    George Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    Sir William Ruthven
    his father



    Janet Ruthven (Halyburton), 6th Lady Dirletoun
    his mother



    Patrick Halyburton, 5th/6th Lord Dirletoun
    her father



    George Halyburton, 3rd/4th Lord Dirletoun
    his father



    Sir John Halyburton
    his father



    Marjorie Stewart Haliburton, Countess of Atholl
    his mother



    Joanna Moray, Lady of Drumersgard
    her mother



    Joan de Menteith
    her mother



    Helena of Mar
    her mother



    Gartnait MacDomhnaill, 7th Earl of Mar
    her father



    Elen ferch Llywelyn, Countess
    his mother



    Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of Wales
    her father



    Iorwerth Drwyndwn ap Owain
    his father



    Gwladys verch Llywarch
    his mother



    Dyddgu verch Iorwerth
    her mother



    Iorwerth ap Cadwgon
    her father



    Cadwgon ap Elystan
    his father



    Elystan Glodrydd ap Cuhelyn, Earl of Hereford
    his father



    Cuhelyn ap Ifor, Lord of Builth
    his father



    Ifor ap Seferws, Lord of Builth
    his father



    Seferws ap Cadwr, Lord of Builth
    his father



    Cadwr ap Idnerth, King of Builth
    his father



    Idnerth ab Iowerth
    his father



    Arianwen verch Brychan, Saint
    his mother



    St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog
    her father

    St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog is your 35th great grandfather.

    http://www.geni.com/people/St-Brychan-Gododdin-Brenin-Brycheiniog/377661791800005806?through=4822569528910053382

    ****************************************************************************************************************
    Arianwen verch Brychan, Saint is your 34th great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Arianwen-verch-Brychan/6000000015917970783?through=377661791800005806

    Arianwen . verch Brychan, Saint MP
    Birth: estimated between 587 and 647
    Immediate Family:

    Daughter of St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog and Ribrawst verch Vortigern
    Wife of Iowerth "Hirvlawd" ap Tegonwy
    Mother of Idnerth ab Iowerth and St. Caenog Mawr ap Iowerth
    Sister of Cledwyn ap Brychan, Saint; Rhydog ap Brychan; Arthen ap Brychan, Saint; Dingad ap Brychan, Saint and Gerwyn ap Brychan, Saint
    Half sister of Nefai ap Brychan, Saint; Pabiali ap Brychan, Saint; Pasgen ap Brychan, Saint; Brychan ap Brychan; Nevydd verch Brychan; St. Cynbryd ap Brychan; Rhieingar verch Brychan; Envail verch Brychan, Saint; Hychan ap Brychan, Saint; Gwendydd verch Brychan, Saint; Dogvan ap Brychan, Saint; Tybïe verch Brychan; Mathaiarn ap Brychan; Elined verch Brychan, Saint; Tydvyl verch Brychan; Rhun ap Brychan, Saint; Goleuddydd verch Brychan, Saint; St. Dyvrig ap Brychan; Hawystl verch Brychan, Saint; St. Cledog ap Brychan; Gwen verch Brychan, Saint; Tydiau verch Brychan, Saint; St. Ceindrych verch Brychan; St. Cymhorth verch Brychan; St. Cyvlevyr ap Brychan; St. Cenedlon verch Brychan; Llechau ap Brychan; Mechell verch Brychan; St. Cadog ap Brychan; St. Dyvnan ap Brychan; St. Caian ap Brychan; St. Dwynwen verch Brychan; Dilic ap Brychan; St. Ive ap Brychan; Wensent ap Brychan; Gwenrhiw verch Brychan; Tudwen verch Brychan; Tudwen ap Brychan; St. Lanent ap Brychan; St. Curig ap Brychan; Callwen verch Brychan; Wynup ap Brychan; Callwen ap Brychan; St. Adwen verch Brychan; St. Morwenna verch Brychan; Cynidr ap Brychan; St. Helie verch Brychan; St. Clether ap Brychan; Llud verch Brychan; Llofan ap Brychan; St. Mabyn verch Brychan; Bethan verch Brychan; Llonio ap Brychan; St. Tedda ap Brychan; Hunydd verch Brychan; St. Menfre verch Brychan; Heilin ap Brychan; Afallach ap Brychan; St. Endelienta verch Brychan; Tamalanc ap Brychan; Beiol verch Brychan; Enoder ap Brychan; Edwen verch Brychan; St. Yse verch Brychan; Gwynnyn ap Brychan; Gwynnys ap Brychan; St. Ceinwen verch Brychan; St. Nectan ap Brychan; St. Nennocha ap Brychan; St. Cynan Ap Brychan; St. Cynog ap Brychan; Meleri verch Brychan, Saint; Gwdfil verch Brychan; Tudhistil verch Brychan, Saint; Saint Gwawl ferch Brychan; Nyfain verch Brychan; St. Arianwen Hirflawdd; Gwrgon verch Brychan, Saint; Rhain ap Brychan, Saint, Brenin Brycheiniog and Gwladys verch Brychan, Saint

    Curated by: Catherine (Erin) Spiceland

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Thu Apr 18, 2013 10:13 am

    http://www.geni.com/projects/Saints/622

    Scope of Project

    This project identifies Saints from all religions who have ancestry here on Geni.

    Overview

    Saints are individuals of exceptional holiness who are important in many religions, particularly Christianity.

    Though the term is mostly used for Christians considered exceptionally virtuous, many religions use similar concepts to venerate individuals worthy of honor in some way, e.g., see Hindu saints. John A. Coleman S.J., Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley,[3] wrote that saints across various cultures and religions have the following family resemblances: exemplary model; extraordinary teacher; wonder worker or source of benevolent power; intercessor; selfless, ascetic behavior; and possessor of a special and revelatory relation to the holy.[4] While there are parallels between these (and other) concepts and that of sainthood, each of these concepts has specific meanings within a given religion.[citation needed] Also, new religious movements have sometimes taken to using the word in cases where the people so named would not be regarded as saints within mainstream Christianity. Some of the Cao Dai saints and saints of Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica are examples of such.[citation needed] The anthropologist [5] Lawrence Babb in an article about Sathya Sai Baba asks the question "Who is a saint?", and responds by saying that in the symbolic infrastructure of some religions, there is the image of a certain extraordinary spiritual king's "miraculous powers", to whom frequently a certain moral presence is attributed. These saintly figures, he asserts, are "the focal points of spiritual force-fields," exerting "powerful attractive influence on followers but touch the inner lives of others in transforming ways as well."

    Christianity

    Roman Catholic Church

    One Roman Catholic website states that "There are over 10,000 named saints and beati from history, the Roman Martyrology and Orthodox sources, but no definitive head count".[7] Rev. Alban Butler, published Lives of the Saints in 1756, containing 1,486 saints. The latest edition of this work, edited by Father Herbert Thurston, S.J., and British author Donald Attwater, contains the lives of 2,565 saints.[8] Monsignor Robert Sarno, an official of Vatican's Congregation for the Causes of Saints, expressed that it is impossible to say the exact number of saints.[9] The Catholic Church teaches that it does not, in fact, make anyone a saint. Rather, it recognizes a saint.[10] In the Church, the title of Saint refers to a person who has been formally canonized (officially recognized) by the Catholic Church, and is therefore believed to be in Heaven. By this definition there are many people believed to be in Heaven who have not been formally declared as saints (most typically due to their obscurity and the involved process of formal canonization) but who may nevertheless generically be referred to as saints. All in Heaven are, in the technical sense, saints, since they are believed to be completely perfected in holiness.[11] Unofficial devotions to uncanonized individuals take place in certain regions.[12] Sometimes the word "saint" is used to refer to Christians still sojourning here on earth.[1] In his book, Saint of the Day, editor Leonard Foley, OFM, says this of saints: "[Saints'] surrender to God's love was so generous an approach to the total surrender of Jesus that the Church recognizes them as heroes and heroines worthy to be held up for our inspiration. They remind us that the Church is holy, can never stop being holy and is called to show the holiness of God by living the life of Christ." [13] In his book, Making Saints: How the Catholic Church Determines Who Becomes a Saint, Who Doesn't and Why, author Kenneth Woodward notes the following: A saint is always someone through whom we catch a glimpse of what God is like -- and of what we are called to be. Only God 'makes' saints, of course. The church merely identifies from time to time a few of these for emulation. The church then tells the story. But the author is the Source of the grace by which saints live. And there we have it: A saint is someone whose story God tells.[14] The veneration of saints, in Latin, cultus, or the "cult of the saints", describes a particular popular devotion to the saints. Although the term "worship" is sometimes used, it is intended in the old-sense meaning to honor or give respect (dulia). According to the Catholic Church, Divine Worship is properly reserved only for God (latria) and never to the saints.[15] They can be asked to intercede or pray for those still on earth,[16] just as one can ask someone on earth to pray for them. A saint may be designated as a patron saint of a particular cause or profession, or invoked against specific illnesses or disasters, sometimes by popular custom and sometimes by official statements of the Magisterium.[17] Saints are not thought to have power of their own, but only that granted by God. Relics of saints are respected in a similar manner to holy images and icons. The practices of past centuries in venerating relics of saints for healing is taken from the early Church.[18] For example, an American deacon claimed in 2000 that Blessed John Henry Newman interceded with God to cure him. The American, Jack Sullivan, asserted that after addressing Newman he was cured of spinal stenosis in a matter of hours. In 2009, a panel of theologians concluded that Sullivan's recovery was the result of his prayer to Newman. According to the Catholic Church, to be deemed a miracle, "a medical recovery must be instantaneous, not attributable to treatment, disappear for good."[19] Once a person has been declared a saint, the body of the saint is considered holy.[20] The remains of saints are called holy relics and are usually used in churches. Saints' personal belongings may also be used as relics.[20] Some of the saints have a symbol that represents their life. In Church tradition, a person who is seen as exceptionally holy can be declared a saint by a formal process, called canonization. Formal canonization is a lengthy process often taking many years, even centuries.[21] The first step in this process is an investigation of the candidate's life, undertaken by an expert. After this, the report on the candidate is given to the bishop of the area and more studying is done. It is then sent to the Congregation for the Causes of Saints in Rome.[22] If the application is approved, the person may be granted the title of "Venerable".[22] Further investigations may lead to the candidate's beatification and given title of "Blessed."[22] At a minimum, two important miracles are required to be formally declared a saint. These miracles must be posthumous. [22] Finally, when all of this is done the Pope canonizes the saint.

    Eastern Orthodoxy

    In the Eastern Orthodox Church a saint is defined as anyone who is in Heaven, whether recognized here on earth, or not.[2] By this definition, Adam and Eve, Moses, the various prophets, except for the angels and archangels are all given the title of "Saint". Sainthood in the Orthodox Church does not necessarily reflect a moral model, but the communion with God: there are countless examples of people who lived in great sin and became saints by humility and repentance, such as Mary of Egypt, Moses the Ethiopian, and of course Dysmas, the repentant thief who was crucified. Therefore, a more complete definition of what a saint is, has to do with the way that saints, through their humility and their love of humankind, saved inside them the entire Church, and loved all people. Orthodox belief considers that God reveals his saints through answered prayers and other miracles.[2] Saints are usually recognized by a local community, often by people who directly knew them. As their popularity grows they are often then recognized by the entire church. The formal process of recognition involves deliberation by a synod of bishops.[2] If successful, this is followed by a service of Glorification in which the Saint is given a day on the church calendar to be celebrated by the entire church.[23] This does not, however, make the person a saint; the person already was a saint and the Church ultimately recognized it. It is believed that one of the ways the holiness (sanctity) of a person is revealed, is through the condition of their relics (remains).[citation needed] In some Orthodox countries (such as Greece, but not in Russia) graves are often reused after 3 to 5 years because of limited space. Bones are washed and placed in an ossuary, often with the person's name written on the skull. Occasionally when a body is exhumed something miraculous is reported as having occurred; exhumed bones are claimed to have given off a fragrance, like flowers, or a body is reported as having remained free of decay, despite not having been embalmed (traditionally the Orthodox do not embalm the dead) and having been buried for some years in the earth.[citation needed] The reason relics are considered sacred is because, for the Orthodox, the separation of body and soul is unnatural.[citation needed] Body and soul both comprise the person, and in the end, body and soul will be reunited; therefore, the body of a saint shares in the “Holiness” of the soul of the saint.[citation needed] As a general rule only clergy will touch relics in order to move them or carry them in procession, however, in veneration the faithful will kiss the relic to show love and respect toward the saint.[citation needed] Every altar in every Orthodox church contains relics, usually of martyrs. Church interiors are covered with the Icons of saints.[citation needed] Because the Church shows no true distinction between the living and the dead (the saints are considered to be alive in Heaven), saints are referred to as if they were still alive. Saints are venerated but not worshipped. They are believed to be able to intercede for salvation and help mankind either through direct communion with God, or by personal intervention. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the titles "Όσιος" for men and "Οσία" for women are also used.[citation needed] This is a title attributed to saints who had lived a monastic or eremitic life, and it is equal to the more usual title of "Saint".

    Anglicanism

    In the Anglican Communion and the Continuing Anglican movement, the title of Saint refers to a person who has been elevated by popular opinion as a pious and holy person. The saints are seen as models of holiness to be imitated, and as a 'cloud of witnesses' that strengthen and encourage the believer during his or her spiritual journey (Hebrews 12:1). The saints are seen as elder brothers and sisters in Christ. Official Anglican creeds recognise the existence of the saints in heaven. So far as invocation of the saints is concerned,[24] one of the Church of England's Articles of Religion "Of Purgatory" condemns "the Romish Doctrine concerning...(the) Invocation of Saints" as "a fond thing vainly invented, and grounded upon no warranty of Scripture, but rather repugnant to the Word of God". However, each of the 44 member churches in the Anglican Communion are free to adopt and authorise their own official documents, and the Articles are not officially normative in all of them (e.g., The Episcopal Church USA, which relegates them to "Historical Documents"). Anglo-Catholics in Anglican provinces using the Articles often make a distinction between a "Romish" and a "Patristic" doctrine concerning the invocation of saints, permitting the latter. In high-church contexts, such as Anglo-Catholicism, a saint is generally one to whom has been attributed (and who has generally demonstrated) a high level of holiness and sanctity. In this use, a saint is therefore not a believer, but one who has been transformed by virtue. In Roman Catholicism, a saint is a special sign of God's activity. The veneration of saints is sometimes misunderstood to be worship, in which case it is derisively termed "hagiolatry". Some Anglicans and Anglican churches, particularly Anglo-Catholics, personally ask prayers of the saints. However, such a practice is seldom found in any official Anglican liturgy. Unusual examples of it are found in The Korean Liturgy 1938, the liturgy of the Diocese of Guiana 1959 and The Melanesian English Prayer Book. Anglicans believe that the only effective Mediator between the believer and God the Father, in terms of redemption and salvation, is God the Son, Jesus Christ. Historical Anglicanism has drawn a distinction between the intercession of the saints and the invocation of the saints. The former was generally accepted in Anglican doctrine, while the latter was generally rejected. There are some, however, in Anglicanism, who do beseech the saints' intercession. Those who beseech the saints to intercede on their behalf make a distinction between "mediator" and "intercessor," and claim that asking for the prayers of the saints is no different in kind than asking for the prayers of living Christians. Anglican Catholics understand sainthood in a more Catholic or Orthodox way, often praying for intercessions from the saints and celebrating their feast days. According to the Church of England, a saint is one who is sanctified, as it translates in the Authorised King James Version (1611) 2 Chronicles 6:41 Now therefore arise, O LORD God, into thy resting place, thou, and the ark of thy strength: let thy priests, O LORD God, be clothed with salvation, and let thy saints rejoice in goodness.

    Protestantism

    In many Protestant churches, the word "saint" is used more generally to refer to anyone who is a Christian. This is similar in usage to Paul's numerous references in the New Testament of the Bible.[26] In this sense, anyone who is within the Body of Christ (i.e., a professing Christian) is a 'saint' because of their relationship with Christ Jesus. Because of this, many Protestants consider prayers to the saints to be idolatry[clarification needed] or even necromancy. Dead Christians are awaiting resurrection, and are not able to do anything for the living saint. Within some Protestant traditions, "saint" is also used to refer to any born-again Christian. Many emphasise the traditional New Testament meaning of the word, preferring to write "saint" to refer to any believer, in continuity with the doctrine of the priesthood of all believers.

    Lutheranism

    In the Lutheran Church, all Christians on earth are considered saints. Lutherans also regard Christians in heaven as saints and are even willing to honor those that the Roman Catholic Church regards as saints, but in a qualified way. According to the Augsburg Confession,[27] the term "saint" is used in the manner of the Roman Catholic Church only insofar as to denote a person who received exceptional grace, was sustained by faith and whose good works are to be an example to any Christian. Traditional Lutheran belief accounts that prayers to the saints are prohibited, as they are not mediators of redemption.[28][29] But, Lutherans do believe that saints pray for the Christian Church in general.[30] Philip Melancthon, the author of the Apology of the Augsburg Confession, approved honoring the saints by saying they are honored in three ways: 1. By thanking God for examples of His mercy; 2. By using the saints as examples for strengthening our faith; 3. By imitating their faith and other virtues.[31][32][33] The Lutheran Churches also have liturgical calendars in which they honor individuals as saints.

    Methodism

    While Methodists as a whole do not practice the patronage or veneration of saints, they do honor and admire them. Methodists believe that all Christians are saints, but mainly use the term to refer to bibilical people, Christian leaders, and martyrs of the faith. Many Methodist churches are named after saints, such as the Twelve Apostles, John Wesley, etc. Although, most are named after geographical locations associated with an early circuit or prominent location. Some Methodist congregations observe All Saints Day if they follow the liturgical calendar. Many encourage the study of saints, that is, the biography of holy people. The 14th Article of Religion in the United Methodist Discipline states, "The Romish doctrine concerning purgatory, pardon, worshiping, and adoration, as well of images as of relics, and also invocation of saints, is a fond thing, vainly invented, and grounded upon no warrant of Scripture, but repugnant to the Word of God." John Wesley, the theological father of world Methodism, did not practice or permit Roman Catholic practices associated with the veneration of the Virgin Mary or prayers to saints.

    Other Christian groups

    There are some groups which are generally classified as Protestants who do not accept the idea of the Communion of Saints. Some believe all of the departed are in soul sleep until the final resurrection on Judgment Day. Others believe that the departed go to either Paradise or Tartarus, to await the day in which the living and the dead are judged. Certain protestant groups, such as the Baptists, do not believe that the departed have any connection with the living.

    Oriental Orthodox Churches

    The Syriac Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Ethiopian Orthodox, Eritrean Orthodox, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church and Armenian Apostolic churches do accept the existence of saints, but officially recognize them via their own individual processes. For example, the Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria canonizes saints, through the approval of that church's Holy Synod. A requirement of the Coptic Orthodox faith is that at least 50 years must pass from a saint's death to his canonization, and the Coptic Orthodox Pope must follow that rule.

    Latter-day Saints

    The beliefs of members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or Mormons with regard to saints are similar to the Protestant tradition described above. In the New Testament the saints are all those who have entered into the Christian covenant of baptism. The qualification "latter-day" refers to the doctrine that members are living in the "latter days", before the second coming of Jesus Christ, and is used to distinguish the members of the Mormon church, which considers itself the restoration of the ancient Christian church. Therefore members are often referred to as "Latter-day Saints" or "LDS", and among themselves as "Saints".

    Judaism

    Judaism speaks of a class of unidentified individuals known as Tzadikkim.


    The Thirty Six are Hidden Wikipedia Tzadikim Nistarim

    A tzaddik whose righteousness remains unknown to his community. It is said that in every generation there are 36 tzaddikim nistarim in addition to 36 revealed tzaddikim. Together they combine to form the 72 bridges, which correspondes to the 72 letter Name of G-d.


    Tzaddik Nistar Concealed Righteous one.

    "There are not less than 36 tzaddikim/righteous persons in the world who receive the Shekhinah/the Divine Presence", Babylonian Talmud: Sanhedrin 97b, Sukkot 45b.


    Lamedvavniks (lamed vov is Hebrew for thirty six)

    Lamedvavnik is the Yiddish term for one of the 36 humble righteous ones or Tzadikim mentioned in kabbalah or Jewish mysticism. These holy people are hidden; i.e., nobody knows who they are. According to some versions of the story, they themselves may not know who they are.

    For the sake of these 36 hidden saints, God preserves the world even if the rest of humanity has degenerated to the level of total barbarism.

    According to Yoma 38b,one righteous man can ensure the existence of the world. No sooner is one righteous man removed from the world than he is succeeded by another righteous man as good as he.

    Sunni Islam

    The Arabic term wali (Arabic ولي, plural Awliyā' أولياء) is commonly translated into English as "Saint". However, the wali should not be confused with the Christian tradition of sainthood. A prominent early scholar of Sunni Islamic beliefs, Ahmad ibn Muhammad al-Tahawi, mentioned in his book "Al-Aqidah At-Tahawiya": We do not prefer any of the saintly men among the Ummah over any of the Prophets but rather we say that any one of the Prophets is better than all the awliya' put together. We believe in what we know of Karamat, the marvels of the awliya' and in authentic stories about them from trustworthy sources.[35] Unlike Prophets and Messengers, Saints in Islam can be either male and female. One of the most well known of them is Rabia al-Adawiyya.

    Sufism

    In Sufism, the major wali are considered to have been masters in the art of spiritual purification. Some groups within Islam hold the Hadrat (literally, Presence, a title of Sufi saints) in esteem. Anthropologists have also noted the parallels between the regard for some Sufi figures in popular Muslim observance and Christian ideas of sainthood. In some Muslim countries there are shrines at the tombs of Sufi saints, with the observation of festival days on the anniversary of death, and a tradition of miracle-working. In some cases, the rites are observed according to the solar calendar, rather than the normal Islamic lunar calendar.

    Other

    Hazrat Babajan (c. 1806 - September 18, 1931) was a Baloch Muslim saint considered by her followers to be a sadguru or qutub

    Other religions

    The use of the term "saint" is not exclusive to Christianity. In many religions, there are people who have been recognized within their tradition as having fulfilled the highest aspirations of religious teaching. In English, the term saint is often used to translate this idea from many world religions.

    Hinduism

    There are individuals who have been described as being Hindu saints, most of whom have also been more specifically identified by the terms Mahatma, Paramahamsa, or Swami, or with the titles Sri or Srila.

    Sikhism

    The concept of sant or bhagat is found in North Indian religious thought including Sikhism. Figures such as Kabir, Ravidas, Nanak, and others are widely regarded as belonging to the Sant tradition. Some of their mystical compositions are incorporated in the Guru Granth Sahib. The term "Sant" is still sometimes loosely applied to living individuals in the Sikh and related communities.

    Buddhism

    Buddhists hold the Arhats and Arahants in special esteem, as well as Bodhisattvas and Buddhas.

    Afro-American Religion

    Cuban Santeria, Haitian Vodou, Brazilian Umbanda and Candomble, and other similar syncretist religions adopted the Catholic saints, or at least the images of the saints, and applied their own spirits/deities to them. They are worshiped in churches (where they appear as saints) and in religious festivals, where they appear as the deities. The name santeria was originally a pejorative term for those whose worship of saints deviated from Catholic norms.


    http://www.geni.com/projects/Saints/622


    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Thu Apr 18, 2013 10:17 am

    A list of The Saints (St.) that are my blood-lines
    (only great grandmothers & great grandfathers will be listed)

    Saint Arianwen verch Brychan (daughter of St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog)
    is your 34th great grandmother
    http://www.geni.com/people/St-Brychan-Gododdin-Brenin-Brycheiniog/377661791800005806?through=4822569528910053382

    St. Brychan Gododdin, Brenin Brycheiniog is your 35th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/St-Brychan-Gododdin-Brenin-Brycheiniog/377661791800005806?through=4822569528910053382

    Saint Hmayeak I Mamikonian, Viceroy of Armenia is your 46th great grandfather
    http://www.geni.com/people/Dzoyk-Dzuik-Arcruni/6000000008630623545?through=6000000008630636063


    Saint Nerses I the Great is your 49th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Ashkhadar-KING-OF-ALANI/6000000006999030219?through=6000000002512619756

    Saint Margaret of Scotland
    his mother
    ÁRPÁD(házi) Ágota - Agatha, Princess of Hungary
    her mother

    ÁRPÁD(házi) Vajk►Szent István - Saint Stephan, 1st King of Hungary
    her father
    http://www.geni.com/people/Zombor-Horka-of-Transylvania/6000000004690293123?through=6000000002187699244


    St. Lucius Lleuver Mawr, King of the Silures

    http://www.geni.com/people/St-Lucius-Lleuver-Mawr-King-of-the-Silures/6000000000396294595?through=6000000008223095484

    Saint Judicael
    Son of Hoël III de Cornouaille, roi de Bretagne
    This comes from the lineage of:

    Owen Desposyni, Archdruid & Prince Bard
    is your 47th great grandfather
    http://www.geni.com/people/Owen-Desposyni/6000000000172756221?through=6000000003827288033

    Viviane del Acqs, Queen of Burgundy Lady of The Lake
    is your 47th great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Viviane-del-Acqs/6000000019994383181?through=6000000000172756221

    Saint Dareca verch Calpurnius of Ireland is your 50th great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/Saint-Dareca/6000000004089079453?through=6000000002447112218

    Sister of Saint Martin, Bishop of Tours is your 52nd great grandmother
    Father of Saint Martin is your 53rd great grandfather.
    Unknown is your 53rd great grandmother.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Father-of-Saint-Martin/6000000003828196455?through=6000000003828196449

    St. Cyllin / Marius ap Caradog, King of Britain
    your 57th great grandfather
    http://www.geni.com/people/St-Cyllin-Marius-ap-Caradog-King-of-Britain/6000000003827309556?through=6000000000977042088
    Julia, Julia Victoria verch Prasutagus of the Iceni
    is your 57th great grandmother
    http://www.geni.com/people/Julia-of-the-Iceni/6000000000977252112?through=6000000003827309556
    Prasutagus, Brenin o Iceni
    is your 58th great grandfather.
    http://www.geni.com/people/Prasutagus/6000000002118940751?through=6000000000977252112

    Boudicca, Boudicca, Brehines o Iceni, Queen of the Iceni
    is your 58th great grandmother.
    http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2010/029/1/4/Boudicca_warrior_queen_by_Mystic_Oracle.jpg[/img]
    Birth:
    circa 30
    Iceni Tribal Lands, Britannia
    Death:
    circa 62 (32)
    West Midlands, Britannia
    Immediate Family:
    Wife of Prasutagus, Brenin o Iceni
    Mother of Dau verch Prasutagus, of Icenia and Julia, of the Iceni
    http://www.geni.com/people/Boudicca-Queen-of-the-Iceni/6000000003827309569?through=6000000002118940751


    (there will be many more added to this list)

    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Sat Apr 20, 2013 11:39 am

    The Connections to Russia & The Byzantine Emperor,
    The Cumans- Kumans , The Khan of Cumania,
    King of Hungary - Hungarians & Croatia - Croatians,
    Serbia ~ Serbians
    through Schwenger, Handy, Ruthven
    Gray, Stewart, Beaufort - Queen of Scots
    John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster
    Philippa of Hainault, Queen consort of England
    Jeanne de Valois
    The D'Anjou Connection
    KUN Erzsébet of the Kumans, Queen consort of Hungary
    Kotian / Kuthen / Köten Khan of Cumania
    and Erzsebet De Galicia, Russian Princess
    KUN Erzsébet ÁRPÁD(házi) V. István - Stephen V, King of Hungary and Croatia

    KUN Erzsébet of the Kumans, Queen consort of Hungary is your 23rd great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/KUN-Erzs%C3%A9bet-of-the-Kumans-Queen-consort-of-Hungary/6000000002304359012

    Family:

    Daughter of Kotian / Kuthen / Köten Khan of Cumania and Erzsebet De Galicia, Russian Princess

    Wife of ÁRPÁD(házi) V. István - Stephen V, King of Hungary and Croatia

    Mother of ÁRPÁD(házi) Katalin, Queen consort of Serbia; ÁRPÁD(házi) Mária; ÁRPÁD(házi) Anna, Empress Consort of Byzantine Emperior; ÁRPÁD(házi) IV. 'Kún' László - Ladislav IV "the Cuman", King of Hungary; ÁRPÁD(házi) Erzsébet, Princess of Hungary; ÁRPÁD(házi) András, Duke of Slavonia; Miss, Hungary; ÁRPÁD(házi) Salamon, Prince of Hungary; ÁRPÁD(házi) Kálmán, Prince of Hungary; ÁRPÁD(házi) Raimond, Prince of Hungary and N ÁRPÁD(házi)

    Half sister of Maria Kotjanovna De Polowzes and another daughter of Köten de Toucy

    ***********************************************************************************

    KUN Erzsébet of the Kumans, Queen consort of Hungary is your 23rd great grandmother.



    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You




    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother






    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father



    JAMES HANDY
    his father



    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother



    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father



    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    John Ruthven
    his father



    George Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    Sir William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven, 2nd Lord of Ruthven
    his father



    Catherine Gray of Buttergask - Stewart - Ruthven
    his mother



    Elisabeth Stewart, Countess of Argyll
    her mother



    John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl
    her father



    Joan Beaufort, Queen consort of Scots
    his mother



    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset
    her father



    John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster
    his father



    Philippa of Hainault, Queen consort of England
    his mother



    Jeanne de Valois
    her mother



    Marguerite d'Anjou, comtesse d'Anjou et du Maine
    her mother



    ÁRPÁD(házi) Mária
    her mother



    KUN Erzsébet of the Kumans, Queen consort of Hungary
    her mother



    THEeXchanger

    Posts: 3911
    Join date: 2011-06-04
    Age: 55

    Re: Walking between The Worlds - Bilocation - The Final Synthesis ... So, who was The eXchanger from The Original Project Avalon & Camelot ? Susan Lynne Schwenger - curated lineages

    Post  THEeXchanger on Sat Apr 20, 2013 12:43 pm

    Genghis Khan (Temüjin) Borjigin, Khagan of the Mongol Empire is your 26th great grandfather.

    Тэмүүжин «Чингис хаан» Боржигин, Их Монгол Улсын хаан MP

    Birth:
    1162
    Hentiy, Mongolia
    Death:
    August 18, 1227 (65)
    Mongolia

    Immediate Family:

    Son of Yesügei, Baɡatur of Xamag Mongɡol and Hoelun Mère du CINGGIS-QAHAN

    Husband of Khulan; Бьорте ужин;
    Хулан-хатун and Yisugen / Yisui Yisui

    Father of Gelejian; Jochi Зүчи Khan; Dzsucsi Kán; ЧАТАЛАЙ хан; Ögedei Khan УГЕДЕЙ хан; Toluj Kán; Тулуй хан Tolui Khan; Chichegen Bilgi; Suthoi Khan; Ходжин-бех Чингиз; Чичихан Чингиз; Алангаа (Алагай, Алаха) Чингиз; Темулен Конкират; Алдуун (Алталун) Конкират; Кюлхан (Хулуген, Кулкан) Чингизид; Харачар Чингизид and Чахур (Джаур) Чингизид

    Brother of Temüge; Temulin / Tämülün (Ferrure) Temulin; Kaszar; Djötchi-Qasar (Hôte-le-Molosse); Khasar; and Khadjiun/QACIUN (Hechuhegejen) Khaji'un

    Half brother of Bäktär (Cuirasse) and Bälgütäi (Faste)

    Curated by:
    Bjørn P. Brox


    http://www.geni.com/people/Genghis-Khan-Tem%C3%BCjin-Borjigin-Khagan-of-the-Mongol-Empire/375784306260002721?through=6000000002576545224

    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You




    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother






    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father



    JAMES HANDY
    his father



    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother



    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father



    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    John Ruthven
    his father



    George Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    Sir William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven, 2nd Lord of Ruthven
    his father



    Catherine Gray of Buttergask - Stewart - Ruthven
    his mother



    Elisabeth Stewart, Countess of Argyll
    her mother



    John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl
    her father



    Joan Beaufort, Queen consort of Scots
    his mother



    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset
    her father



    John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster
    his father



    Philippa of Hainault, Queen consort of England
    his mother



    Jeanne de Valois
    her mother



    Marguerite d'Anjou, comtesse d'Anjou et du Maine
    her mother



    ÁRPÁD(házi) Mária
    her mother



    KUN Erzsébet of the Kumans, Queen consort of Hungary
    her mother



    Kotian / Kuthen / Köten Khan of Cumania
    her father



    Suthoi Khan
    his father



    Genghis Khan (Temüjin) Borjigin, Khagan of the Mongol Empire
    his father

    **************************************************************************************
    The first wife of Genghis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire.
    Börte became the head of the first Court of Genghis Khan,
    and Grand Empress of his Empire...
    Börte Üjin Impératrice (Конкират Konkirat),
    Empresse Бьорте ужин is your 26th great grandmother.

    http://www.geni.com/people/%D0%91%D1%8C%D0%BE%D1%80%D1%82%D0%B5-%D1%83%D0%B6%D0%B8%D0%BD/375784738310012619?through=6000000002576545224

    Börte Üjin Impératrice (Конкират Konkirat), Empresse is your 26th great grandmother

    Birth:
    circa 1162
    Mongolia
    Death:
    circa 1230 (68)
    Mongolia

    Immediate Family:

    Daughter of Дай-нойон and Tchotan Tshötan Qonggirat Конкират

    Wife of Genghis Khan (Temüjin) Borjigin, Khagan of the Mongol Empire

    Mother of Jochi Зүчи Khan; Dzsucsi Kán; ЧАТАЛАЙ хан; Ögedei Khan УГЕДЕЙ хан; Toluj Kán; Тулуй хан Tolui Khan; Chichegen Bilgi; Suthoi Khan; Ходжин-бех Чингиз; Чичихан Чингиз; Алангаа (Алагай, Алаха) Чингиз; Темулен Конкират and Алдуун (Алталун) Конкират

    Sister of Jakembo Noyan; 王汗 Tughrul Khan and Джамука Конкират

    Currated by:
    Bjørn P. Brox

    Börte Üjin (Mongolian: Бөртэ үжин; born c. 1162) was the first wife of Genghis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire. Börte became the head of the first Court of Genghis Khan, and Grand Empress of his Empire.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borte



    Бьорте ужин is your 26th great grandmother.


    Susan Lynne Schwenger
    You




    Lynda Mae Handy - Schwenger
    your mother






    JAMES "Jim" EDWARD HANDY JR.
    her father



    JAMES HANDY
    his father



    Marian Ruthven - Handy
    his mother



    ALEXANDER RUTHVEN
    her father



    ROBERT RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    JOHN RUTHVEN
    his father



    John Ruthven
    his father



    George Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven
    his father



    Sir William Ruthven
    his father



    William Ruthven, 2nd Lord of Ruthven
    his father



    Catherine Gray of Buttergask - Stewart - Ruthven
    his mother



    Elisabeth Stewart, Countess of Argyll
    her mother



    John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl
    her father



    Joan Beaufort, Queen consort of Scots
    his mother



    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset
    her father



    John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster
    his father



    Philippa of Hainault, Queen consort of England
    his mother



    Jeanne de Valois
    her mother



    Marguerite d'Anjou, comtesse d'Anjou et du Maine
    her mother



    ÁRPÁD(házi) Mária
    her mother



    KUN Erzsébet of the Kumans, Queen consort of Hungary
    her mother



    Kotian / Kuthen / Köten Khan of Cumania
    her father



    Suthoi Khan
    his father



    Бьорте ужин --The first wife of Genghis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire.
    Börte became the head of the first Court of Genghis Khan,
    and Grand Empress of his Empire...
    Börte Üjin Impératrice (Конкират Konkirat),
    Empresse Бьорте ужин is your 26th great grandmother

    his mother



    Last edited by THEeXchanger on Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:23 am; edited 1 time in total

      Current date/time is Wed Aug 20, 2014 5:41 am