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    "Punk is about being alive" by Gunther Sonnenfeld

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    B.B.Baghor

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    "Punk is about being alive" by Gunther Sonnenfeld

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Tue Dec 23, 2014 6:00 pm




    “There are two rules I’ve always tried to live by: turn left, if you’re supposed to turn right; go through any door that you’re not supposed to enter.
    It’s the only way to fight your way through to any kind of authentic feeling in a world beset by fakery.”

    – Malcolm McLaren

    Getting fired should become a ritualistic behavior for more and more people.

    We live in a day and age whereby the punks of the world set the tone for breaking the status quo, for kicking it right in the arse. Punks are innovative. Punks are expressive. Punks are honest. Punks get fired.

    Punk is about being alive.

    To me, ‘being punk’ means having the integrity and perseverance to do what makes you happy, in a system that often challenges every fiber of our being.

    The simple truth is that most ‘jobs’ cause stagnation and complacency. Even if a workplace culture develops (or imposes) levels of ‘innovation’, there’s usually a limit, a threshold, to what a person can achieve on their own, or what he or she can achieve with others. People typically aren’t motivated or inspired by the prospect of creating things — they’re motivated by losing them. That’s the way we’ve been socially engineered, so to speak.

    There’s also the idea of meritocracy, which is mostly counterintuitive to the way businesses currently operate. I used to think that if I did great work, if I exceeded expectations, I’d be rewarded for it. Sadly, that’s rarely the case.

    My parents always taught me to never cut corners or to cheat the system. They had a tremendous work ethic (still do), and instilled in me a prideful way of doing things, of making things. They also gave me the freedom to create and experiment. That was probably the greatest gift they bestowed upon me, and the fact that I didn’t have to build a career.

    Instead of a career, I’ve developed a vocation, a passion for an overall craft. What is that craft? It is a multifaceted desire to democratize information systems. I’ve effectively created my own system of merit.

    That’s ‘what I do’: I democratize information systems. I do it through skills built in developing technologies and telling stories. I do it with the intention of transforming businesses.

    Maybe that sounds hokey, maybe it doesn’t. Fact is, I’ve never held a title that did my intentions justice, so in telling the truth about my intentions here, that is my declaration. Naturally, a recruiter wouldn’t have the foggiest idea of what that means. You don’t typically ‘place’ someone into a job with that kind of descriptor. Then again, I’ve had more than a few headhunters represent me, and not one of them ever landed me a job. I’ve always created my own opportunities, including the positions I’ve held at companies.

    If I know what I do as well as I should, then I also know that as an ‘outsider’, I bring a ton of value to companies. As an ‘insider’, there’s a tendency to become a commodity. I’ve been rendered a commodity for the majority of my career. A lot of people know that story. Of course, there are great exceptions to the rule. I’ve held some good jobs. Nevertheless, playing the higher odds never afforded me the chance, a real chance, to build my craft. Which is why I’ve always created my own opportunities.

    Being vigilant, being punk, has, over time, enabled me to attract people I really respect and admire — good people with strong values. Those are the people with whom I work, and I’m very grateful for that.

    I do what I do for living, not just for ‘a’ living. I do it as a way of seeing. Seeing is the ability to understand what drives you, and, what about that drive motivates others. Getting to that place — developing an ‘eye’ for the way things are and the way they can be — has been quite a trip, to say the least.

    One of the main reasons why I don’t hold a lot of fear is because I’ve built up my muscles for risk and uncertainty. A lot of people constantly live in fear.

    Fear of success.

    Fear of failure.

    Fear of losing a position to someone else.

    Fear of responsibility.

    Fear of self-expression.

    Fear of the unknown.

    The fear that doing the right thing will cost you something.

    Maybe it will, maybe it won’t. Maybe it doesn’t really matter.

    When you experience enough loss, enough ‘losing’, your perspective shifts. You lose your fear. You let go.

    That’s punk.

    For now, I can honestly say that this realization changes your relationship to the world, to life, to people, to beings and all living things. When you don’t fear things, you embrace life. When you embrace life, you focus on what’s important, which is to become the best person you can be. You learn how to make those left turns in the face of seduction, or in the heaviest moments of adversity. You develop the skills and perspectives in becoming human. You manifest them as a human becoming. Becoming, like anything emergent, is a constant state of awareness, of higher consciousness, a form of refinement that propels you to think and act on behalf of other people.

    That is, if you so choose.

    Getting back to the subject of work, and getting fired, this is, of course, a game-changer. You start to reconcile with the fact that business is just a lens into the human condition, and if you treat it properly, you can transcend all the bullsh— resident in ‘the system’. Living in higher consciousness is an amazing thing, but it is also an incredible responsibility, and often times, quite a burden.

    The word ‘business’ is funny, when you think about it. Separate it and you have the words ‘busy’ and ‘ness’. Those two derivations essentially translate to “the state of being busy”. That contradicts the forces of life, of being or becoming. So we need to be careful about what we want from business, and what business means in our lives.

    I just mentioned that the responsibility piece isn’t easy. Living and working within the system allows you to check out, as it were, to deflect ownership of certain roles and responsibilities, to not be responsible for yourself or others. This is basically why many companies, and some of the people who play certain roles within them, are so royally screwed up. Being responsible, or becoming accountable, is a choice you are free to make, and it doesn’t mean anything other than you’ve made that choice.

    However, if you want to enjoy the benefits of becoming, you must choose to become. And there’s lots of meaning in that. Sometimes we suffer on account of it. But that’s okay. That’s why we’re here.

    There are three really important things I’ve learned about being punk and evolving as a human becoming. Perhaps they might mean something to you, in your own way, and through your own intentions.

    1. Artistic expression is a necessary virus to allay the fears of the masses; (‘We’ are the mass; let’s stop living in fear, and be our truest selves, together.)

    2. Stories are genomic and ribonucleic in nature; narratives literally shift consciousness and manifest certain outcomes (‘dark’, ‘light’ or ‘other’). Whether it’s your story, or ‘a’ story, what each of us says and does really matters;

    3. There are multiple realities through which we experience ourselves becoming, and through which we experience truths “on the part of the other”. This is essentially the journey of life, in all of its grit and glory; more importantly, it’s how we become ‘we’.

    Being punk liberates the self from imposition and limitations tied to “what isn’t” or “what can’t be”. So, if you start a company, or spawn an idea, cherish it, because it affects everything around you. Everything you say and do affects everything around you.

    When we create ‘businesses’, we are actually activating a type of intent, an intentionality of sorts. We are making declarations to the world that “this is what we are doing” as well as “this is who we are”. But remember, when we do this, we are also confronting the busy part of consciousness, most commonly experienced through the unconscious part of ourselves. So, we must always try to be our word, and be present to our actions. We must also be accountable for those actions. As companies, we must be who we say we are, and do what we say we do. Some people call it ‘showing up’. And the reality is, successful companies do just that: they show up, despite all the bad stuff we experience within the system.

    Joseph Campbell said that if you want to change the world, change the metaphor. In business, if you want to change the world, or disrupt a market, become the metaphor, or the intention you seek to manifest.

    Companies spend a lot of time jockeying for position, and manipulating scenarios to achieve certain outcomes, and making false declarations about who they really are (we see this a lot through advertising, as just one example). We’ve all witnessed scattered results and nefarious policies borne from that approach. Look no further than the current economy for a live use case of why it’s not sustainable.

    The punk part of you, as a member of any organization, insists on becoming a catalyst through some form of artistic expression. I believe that artistic expression saves the world from itself. It can certainly save businesses from themselves.

    People — especially young people — are often told that they aren’t artistic, or that they can’t create things, or that they are strictly ‘right-’ or ‘left-brained’. That’s nonsense. I’ve personally witnessed accountants completely transform themselves with certain tools, in the right environments. I’ve seen programmers step outside of their shells and look at their work as art. People are capable of truly incredible things when they allow themselves the chance, and when the conditions for being comfortable to create are made available to them.

    Artistic expression is everything. Even in making money. Hell, Warhol thought making money was the best kind of art.

    So go make art. Be punk. Be you. Make great stuff, and be earnest about it.

    And if you decide to work for other people, get fired as much as possible. Captains of industry and a world mired in transition will thank you for it, sooner rather than later.

    Written by Gunther Sonnenfeld Dec. 21 2014

    Source: https://medium.com/@goonth/get-fired-be-punk-do-what-you-do-be-who-you-are-b05ee498a4fd
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    B.B.Baghor

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    Visualizing Context in a Universe of Information

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:47 am




    By Gunther Sonnenfeld

    CIO at Faveeo (social web intelligence).
    Partner, LUMAN (social innovation). Partner, Codemonkeys (tech development).


    Visualizing Context in a Universe of Information
    Jan. 25 2015

    Taking contextual mechanics into the social publishing realm.
    The Social Publishing Landscape

    I’d like to take a few moments to share some of the things we’re working on at Faveeo.
    I’ve had the pleasure and good fortune of working with the team for over a year now,
    and I am enjoying my role as the company’s CIO.

    There are lots of great platforms that curate information, and give people capabilities to
    publish content, as well as measure the impact that content has within a digital ecosystem.

    Our mission at Faveeo is to focus on three primary (and very critical) elements:

    · search as a function of discovery

    · communities as forms of intelligence

    · intelligence as a currency for understanding & building markets

    Similar to the way Google and Yahoo! have built up their businesses concurrently on the
    enterprise and consumer sides, we are looking at building up a ‘social web index’ that
    connects networks through small data and rich content. The seminal investor, Marc Andreessen,
    has described this as a form of rebundling.

    Rebundling as a Participatory Construct

    Our CEO, Alexis Dufresne, elaborated further on the concept of rebundling when we were in Paris
    in December for LeWeb:

    “We endeavor to build a whole new type of news organization through social web intelligence.
    That effort comprises a form of rebundling whereby we look at content within the social web as
    a far more participatory set of actions, created by users (people) and monetized in a decentralized way. ”

    To provide some more context for you, here is a matrix of the ecosystem in which we currently play.
    There are four primary coordinates along the axes — data/analytics, content strength, influencer capa-
    bilities and network reach. For further reading go here:


    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/visualizing-context-universe-information-gunther-sonnenfeld
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    mudra

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    Re: "Punk is about being alive" by Gunther Sonnenfeld

    Post  mudra on Thu Jan 29, 2015 4:01 pm

    Ex-punk band bass player and author of several books including 'Hardcore Zen' 'Sit Down And Shut Up' and 'Zen Wrapped In Karma Dipped in Chocolate', Brad explains that 'If you question everything thoroughly enough, the truth will eventually hit you upside the head and you will KNOW. But here's a warning: It won't be what you imagined. It won't even be close.

    Brad Warner - 'Hardcore Zen' - Interview by Iain McNay
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RytK9BmEVk0



    Love Always
    mudra
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    B.B.Baghor

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    When Acts of Kindness Aren't So Small or Random

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:48 pm



    When Acts of Kindness Aren't So Small or Random

    by Gunther Sonnenfeld Feb. 2 2015

    The responsibility of giving means something more as we make active agreements. The other day I met a woman
    who was having a late lunch beside me at a local restaurant. We struck up a conversation.

    She said it was the first time she visited the area, and was renting a house to 'write and relax', as she described it.
    She's a financial journalist, and seemingly quite successful at it.

    As she continued to speak about it, there was also a sadness in her eyes, something missing. We began talking about
    literary adaptations, and soon it became clear that her passion was for film. I assumed she was a screenwriter 'on the side'.

    Turns out she's never finished a screenplay. I asked her why, and she rattled off a number of reasons, but ultimately
    conceded that she never really gave it a chance. We continued our discussion, and she began talking about a great
    biblical scene from one of Paul Thomas Anderson's films, Magnolia. (Anderson is the same director of the current,
    critically acclaimed release, Inherent Vice.)

    I mentioned that someone gave me a signed and framed poster of that very scene from Magnolia many years ago.
    She said, almost flippantly: "Well, if I had that poster, I would most certainly write a screen-play again."
    I replied: "Do you promise?" "Do I promise what?" "That you'll write a screenplay again if I give you the poster."

    She paused.

    "You would do that? For a stranger, no less? You don't even know me..." I sorted through the logic for both of us...

    "You've revealed to me something important about yourself. So why wouldn't I? If it means that much to you for
    you to do something you're already passionate about, I would feel good that the poster was in your possession.
    Who knows, maybe you can give it to someone else someday."

    I proceeded to tell her that I would need to first fly home to the west coast, get the poster out of storage, clean it up,
    and then send it to her, but that I would certainly live up to my word. We now have an agreement.

    I am agreeing to be my word for a certain amount of time that it takes for me to own the responsibility of that agreement,
    while she will be living out that responsibility, hopefully, for the remainder of her life. As for the giving part, no one is 'off
    the hook' once the gift is exchanged: it carries on in another form, often indefinitely.

    The point of this little story isn't to tell you how great giving is (or how great I might think I am for 'offering a gift'),
    but how much we can create when we see an opportunity to give beyond the norms of donation, or tips, or pieces of advice,
    or passive handouts. When the responsibility of giving is shared, it is often far more powerful because we can see the potentiality
    of its ripple effects.

    In my own quest to make more meaning, this is just one of many experiences with which I choose to engage in life and business.
    The lessons tend to sustain themselves and bring forth more actions that provide joy and goodwill in service to others.
    Hence why the 'small' acts can be so important. What experiences have you had lately that provide you with a shared responsibility
    in giving?

    As you think about them - and perhaps share them here - this particular story will continue to unfold...
    And we can all look forward to its outcomes.


    Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/when-acts-kindness-arent-so-small-random-gunther-sonnenfeld

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    B.B.Baghor

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    Re: "Punk is about being alive" by Gunther Sonnenfeld

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Mon Feb 02, 2015 3:14 pm

    mudra wrote:Ex-punk band bass player and author of several books including 'Hardcore Zen' 'Sit Down And Shut Up' and 'Zen Wrapped In Karma Dipped in Chocolate', Brad explains that 'If you question everything thoroughly enough, the truth will eventually hit you upside the head and you will KNOW. But here's a warning: It won't be what you imagined. It won't even be close.

    Brad Warner - 'Hardcore Zen' - Interview by Iain McNay
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RytK9BmEVk0



    Love Always
    mudra

    Thank you, mudra, for this tubby. Brad has a great ability to be precise and shows that truth so clearly, in that we need to be our own authority, but without rebellion in agression, to the outer ones. For all that's opposed and resisted, ultimately, is the same as the inner issues undesired for, not allowed to surface. In the intuitive development trainings, we called that surfacing process "Saying hello to it and allow it to be present"

    Only when I found the source of my rebellious attitude in life, mostly acted out in doing things differently and on my own, but also by being judgemental a lot within, for the irony of my path in life is that I learned to be in service to others, obeying to the church, my parents.... etc. etc. I could change my view on life and see others, no matter how different, as another me, mirroring certain aspects of me that were in denial by myself: pushed pain buttons.

    The beautiful paradox, of becoming into one's own, where everything falls into place, or falls apart.... becoming oneself, is in this, that this state brings the realization that all is one and every part of that One and only One, is as a facet of one huge crystal. And isn't that logical too, in fact? For how can each facet show a different reflection, otherwise than in being sovereign to its own nature, it's own geometrical position on that crystal?

    Voila, that's about it, now I know it all. said Kwetal. I am another you and now I'm going to do the dishes Thubs Up



    Kwetal, one of the little folk, out of the O.B.Bumble books.



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    Seashore

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    Re: "Punk is about being alive" by Gunther Sonnenfeld

    Post  Seashore on Mon Feb 02, 2015 5:14 pm

    mudra wrote:Brad Warner - 'Hardcore Zen' - Interview by Iain McNay
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RytK9BmEVk0

    Both Brad Warner and Iain McNay seem to be such nice people.  I enjoyed the interview very much.

    And I'm glad I've discovered Conscious TV!
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    mudra

    Posts : 18492
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    Re: "Punk is about being alive" by Gunther Sonnenfeld

    Post  mudra on Tue Feb 03, 2015 5:18 am

    Seashore wrote:
    mudra wrote:Brad Warner - 'Hardcore Zen' - Interview by Iain McNay
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RytK9BmEVk0

    Both Brad Warner and Iain McNay seem to be such nice people.  I enjoyed the interview very much.

    And I'm glad I've discovered Conscious TV!
    You are welcome Seashore.
    Conscious TV is a great channel indeed.
    Well worth following.

    Much Love from me
    mudra

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